Geography Courses

Courses of Instruction (GEOG)

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Course Formats
ACE Outcomes
Basic factors influencing the location of economic activity. Influence of space and location on the evolution and development of economic systems. World and regional patterns of economic activities.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Human populations, cultures, and landscapes, with particular attention to human-environment relations and global interconnections.
This course is a prerequisite for: AGRO 305
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 9
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Students who earn credit toward the degree in GEOG 155 may not earn credit toward the degree in GEOG 150 or in the combination of GEOG 150 and 152
Investigation of the basic elements of the physical environment of the earth and its atmosphere. Includes atmospheric processes, temperature distributions, weather systems, severe weather, climates, water balance, vegetation and soil distributions, landforms and their processes, and natural hazards. Modifying influences that humans have on the physical environment and atmosphere examined.
This course is a prerequisite for: GEOG 308, GEOG 418
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 1, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom, Web
ACE Outcomes: 4
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 170
Introduction to Great Plains StudiesCrosslisted as ANTH 170, GPSP 170, NRES 170, SOCI 170
Required for Great Plains Studies majors and minors.
Interdisciplinary study of the natural environment, social environment, human heritage, arts and humanities of the Great Plains.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
Analysis of human's role in altering the quality of the environment through their impact on eco-health, transformation of the landscape, and spatial organization and behavior.
This course is a prerequisite for: AECN 357
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 6, 9
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Offered from time to time by faculty members who wish to examine current problems in geography. May take a variety of forms including the freshman seminar and the minicourse.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Special Topics
GEOG 200
Landscape and Environmental AppreciationCrosslisted as HORT 200, LARC 200
Values and processes in human landscapes and natural environments. Concepts and tools to understand the context of local and global environments and significant historical landscapes. Landscape as an indicator of aesthetic quality, design principles and processes as integrators of humans and nature, and the garden as a model for creating sustainable landscapes.
This course is a prerequisite for: HORT 265
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 2, Recitation 1
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 9, 7
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
The weekly labs in GEOG 217 provide pratical experience. GEOG 217 provides background needed for advanced courses in cartography (GEOG 317), remote sensing (GEOG/NRES 418), and GIS (GEOG/NRES 312 and 412).
Introduction to modern mapping sciences. Interpret and use both traditional and digital maps. Fundamentals of thematic mapping, topographic map analysis, interpretation of aerial and satellite imagery, principles of geographic information systems (GIS), fundamentals of the global positioning (GPS), and mapping on the Internet.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab, Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Introduction to the regional geography of the United States. Attention to the significance of location, advantages and limitations of the natural environment, population distribution, and economic development considered regionally.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
Appraisal of the interaction between the physical environment, the human resources, and economic activities for the major regions of the world. Application of fundamental geographical concepts to regional analysis.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom, Web
ACE Outcomes: 9
Groups: Regional Geography
GEOG 281
Introduction to Water ScienceCrosslisted as NRES 281, WATS 281
Prereqs:
High school chemistry or one semester college chemistry; one course in geology or physical geography or soil.
Survey of the water science from the perspective of both natural and social sciences. Water budget, precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff and stream flow, groundwater, water quality parameters, economics of water, water policy, water law and water politics.
This course is a prerequisite for: NRES 319
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
Experiments to help individuals develop awareness of the extent to which their feelings and behavior are influenced by the spatial and environmental dimensions of their surroundings.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 6
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 305
Geography of AgricultureCrosslisted as AGRO 305, HORT 305
Prereqs:
AGRO 131 or 153 or HORT 130 or GEOG 140 or 155 or equivalent.
Historical, cultural and biophysical constraints of American agriculture through the integration of Web-based sources (USDA geospatial databases), geographic information systems, and spatial/temporal models. Introduction to crops and evolution of agriculture in North America and available digital resources (biogeoinformatics) to understand the patterns, trends, people, places and processes of rural landscapes.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab 3, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 308
BiogeographyCrosslisted as NRES 308, GEOL 308
Prereqs:
Biogeography (GEOG/GEOL/NRES 308) is a highly interdisciplinary science, relying heavily on ecology, geological science, and climatology. It is global in scope and offers the latest knowledge in understanding organism distributions, and the factors that determine those distributions.
Introduction to the basic concepts of biogeography, the study of distributions of plants and animals, both past and present.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 312
Prereqs:
Junior standing; basic computer skills (spreadsheets, word processors, data and file management).
Introduction to the theory and applications of geospatial information technology. Remote sensing, GPS data collection, GIS data types, editing GIS data, and spatial data analysis with emphasis on applications to natural resources using a problem-based learning format.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
6 hrs geography.
Introduction to maps and mapping with emphasis on applied and theoretical considerations in map design and construction. Students create computer maps from specifications of instructor. Opportunity to actively participate in the technical processes of data collection, cartographic design, and construction normally associated with the actual production of maps.
This course is a prerequisite for: GEOG 415, GEOG 417, GEOG 425, GEOG 483
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 4, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Traces the sequence of the human occupancy of the Great Plains from prehistoric times to the present. Focus on the changing perception and utilization of the Great Plains environment, leading to the emergence of a distinctive contemporary region.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 361
Geography of cities and metropolitan areas of the past, present, and future. Spatial structures of urban settlements in North America and elsewhere examined both theoretically and descriptively.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 6
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Survey of the physical and cultural features of the geography of Nebraska as related to the changing patterns in the human occupance of the geographic regions of the state.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
The physical and human geographies of Europe. Population migrations, landscape change, and diversity of culture in Europe and selected sub-regions of Europe.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
Patterns of physical features, population, and economic activities and other cultural aspects. Attention to India, China, and Japan.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
GEOG 377
Women of the Great PlainsCrosslisted as GPSP 377, WMNS 377
GPSP/GEOG/WMNS 377 is 'Letter Grade only'.
The intersections of gender, identity, power, and representation throughout time and space in the Great Plains of the United States and Canada.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom, Web
ACE Outcomes: 5, 9
Introduction to the geography of Mexico, Central America, West Indies, and South America. Advantage and limitations of the natural environment, population distribution, and economic development are considered regionally.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom, Web
Groups: Regional Geography
Prereqs:
Permission.
Selected topic possessing areal implications.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Special Topics
Prereqs:
Permission.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Independent Study
GEOG 399H
Prereqs:
Open to candidates for degrees with distinction, with high distinction, and with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences and to seniors and especially to qualified juniors, with the consent of the instructor.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Independent Study
GEOG 400/800
Seminar in Great Plains StudiesCrosslisted as GPSP 400/800, HIST 400/800
Prereqs:
A course in the study of the Great Plains.
GPSP/GEOG/HIST 400 is required for a GPSP major or minor.
Topic varies.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
Prereqs:
Junior standing.
GEOG 402 serves as the capstone course for the GEOG major.
The history and philosophy of geography. Contemporary issues in geography.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 10
Groups: Philosophy
How space, spatial structure, and spatially oriented behavior operate in social systems, emphasizing their influence on interpersonal communication and/or social exchange.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 408/808
Microclimate: The Biological EnvironmentCrosslisted as AGRO 408/808, HORT 408/808, METR 408/808, NRES 408/808, WATS 408
Prereqs:
Junior standing, MATH 106 or equivalent, 5 hrs physics, major in any of the physical or biological sciences or engineering; or permission.
Physical factors that create the biological environment. Radiation and energy balances of earth's surfaces, terrestrial and marine. Temperature, humidity, and wind regimes near the surface. Control of the physical environment through irrigation, windbreaks, frost protection, manipulation of light, and radiation. Applications to air pollution research. Instruments for measuring environmental conditions and remote sensing of the environment.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 409
Human Dimensions of Natural ResourcesCrosslisted as NRES 409
Prereqs:
Junior standing; 12 credit hours in natural resources, environmental studies, or closely related fields, or permission of instructor.
Overview of the human dimensions of natural resources issues.  Exploration of the socioeconomic, cultural, and political aspects of human behavior and how these interact with, might influence, or are influenced by the environment.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 412/812
Lab exercises provide experience with GIS
Introduction to conceptual foundations and applications of computer-based geographic information systems (GIS). GIS database development, spatial data analysis, spatial modeling, GIS implementation and administration.
This course is a prerequisite for: GEOG 422
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
STAT 218 or 380 and 6 hrs of geography.
Introduction to quantitative techniques utilized in geographic research. Fundamental statistical and mathematical techniques used in analyzing spatial relationships examined.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
Introduction to the tools, techniques, and analytical uses of computer mapping. Programming necessary for producing own computer mapping programs.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
GEOG 317 or permission.
Computer-map design and production for the purpose of assembling an environmental electronic atlas, using advanced computer hardware and software. Extensive discussions and demonstrations on content, design, and methods used in computer mapping.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
GEOG 418/818
Introduction to Remote SensingCrosslisted as NRES 418/818
Prereqs:
9 hrs earth science or natural resource sciences including GEOG 155.
Introduction to remote sensing of the earth from aerial and satellite platforms. Aerial photography, multispectral scanning, thermal imaging and microwave remote sensing techniques. Physical foundations of remote sensing using electromagnetic energy, energy-matter interactions, techniques employed in data acquisition and methods of image analysis. Weekly laboratory provides practical experience in visual and digital interpretation of aerial photography, satellite imagery, thermal and radar imagery. Applications in geographic, agricultural, environmental and natural resources analyses.
This course is a prerequisite for: GEOG 420
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
GEOG 419/819
Applications of Remote Sensing in Agriculture and Natural ResourcesCrosslisted as AGRO 419/819, GEOL 419/819, NRES 420/820
Prereqs:
GEOG/NRES 418.
Introduction to the practical uses of remote electromagnetic sensing in dealing with agricultural and water-resources issues.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
GEOG 418/818 and 419/819; or equivalent.
Principles and methods of digital image processing of remotely sensed data. The biophysical basis of remote sensing and the various sensor systems typically used for monitoring terrestrial and aquatic environments. Algorithms for the preprocessing, enhancement, classification and mapping of digital data for agricultural, urban, geological, environmental, and natural resource management problems.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
GEOG 421/821
Field Techniques in Remote SensingCrosslisted as NRES 421/821
Prereqs:
Field techniques as they relate to remote-sensing campaigns. Research methods, systematic approaches to data collection, field spectroscopy, collecting ancillary information linked with spectroscopic data sets as well as aircraft or satellite missions and subsequent analyses of acquired data.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
GEOG 412/812; or equivalent, or permission.
Vector and quadtree data structures, use of relational database management systems, topologically structured databases, query languages, digital terrain modeling, advanced data analysis methods and research issues in GIS. Extensive practical experience with the current GIS software.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
Prereqs:
GEOG 317 and either 415 or 417, or permission.
Explores cartographic applications of computer animation and multimedia for the dual purposes of assisting visual thinking in map-oriented research and data exploration, and in communicating geographic ideas to others.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 3, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
GEOG 427/827
Prereqs:
Junior standing and a basic familiarity with mapping and GIS, or permission.
Integrated lectures, lab exercises and field experience provide an understanding of GPS technology and applications. Students will learn to collect, correct and use GPS data in a geographic information system (GIS) environment.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lab 1, Lecture 1.5
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 431/831
The history of cultural geography from von Humboldt through Carl Sauer to the 'new' cultural geographies of Don Mitchell, Gillian Rose and Noel Castree. The current theoretical debates of feminism, post-structuralism, post-colonialism and environmentalism, and the influences of literary and cultural studies in the development of cultural geography and the various methodologies involved.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Prereqs:
18 hours of GIS practice or GEOG/NRES 412/812.
Techniques for Geoprocessing script programming to customize geographic information systems (GIS), utilize GIS tools, and implement application-specific spatial analysis, modeling algorithms and procedures.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab 2, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Threats against indigenous peoples' lands, resources and cultural patrimony, languages and knowledge systems more than 500 years after Columbus instigated European colonialism, creating the first global world order. The responses of Indigenous peoples to the imposition of Western dominated economic and political systems. Land rights, economic development, and women's rights from the perspective of different Indigenous communities around the world.
Credit Hours: 3
Max credits per degree: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
Geo-demographic and GIS analysis, interpretation, and mapping of geographical patterns of population size, population composition and population change. Theoretical and applied investigation of geo-demographic issues involving marketing research, environmental impact analysis, public facilities planning, public health provision, and small-area population change forecasting. Particular attention to GIS use of TIGER and small-area Census data.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab, Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 447/847
Importance of factors of a physical, economic, and human character in political development at local to global scales; international geopolitical aspects of environment, territoriality, core areas, capitals, and boundaries; national geographical patterns of voting, representation, public administration and public policy.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 448/848
Pro-seminar in International Relations ICrosslisted as AECN 467, ANTH 479/879, ECON 466/866, HIST 479/879, POLS 466/866, SOCI 466/866
Prereqs:
Senior standing and permission.
Open to students with an interest in international relations.
Topic varies
Credit Hours: 3
Max credits per degree: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Human-Economic Geography
GEOG 450/850
Climate and SocietyCrosslisted as AGRO 450/850, METR 450/850, NRES 452/852
Prereqs:
METR 200 or NRES 370 or equivalent.
Offered spring semester of even-numbered calendar years.
Impact of climate and extreme climatic events on society and societal responses to those events. Global in scope and interdisciplinary.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
For course description, see METR 475/875.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
For course description, see METR 454/854.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
For course description, see METR 442/842.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
For course description, see METR 312.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 467/867
Great Plains Field PedologyCrosslisted as AGRO 477, NRES 477/877, SOIL 477
Prereqs:
AGRO/SOIL 153.
Spatial relationship of soil properties on various parts of landscape typical of the Plains, causal factors, and predictions of such relationships on other landscapes. Grouping these properties into classes, naming the classes, and the taxonomy that results from this grouping. Application of a taxonomy to a real situation through making a field soil survey in a region representative of the Plains border, predicting land use response of various mapped units as it affects the ecosystem, and evaluating the effectiveness of the taxonomic system used in the region surveyed.
This course is a prerequisite for: GEOL 465
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lab, Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 469/869
Bio-Atmospheric InstrumentationCrosslisted as AGRO 469/869, HORT 407/807, METR 469/869, MSYM 469/869, NRES 469/869
Prereqs:
Junior standing; MATH 106; 4 hrs physics; physical or biological science major.
Offered fall semester of odd-numbered calendar years.
Discussion and practical application of principles and practices of measuring meteorological and related variables near the earth's surface including temperature, humidity, precipitation, pressure, radiation and wind. Performance characteristics of sensors and modern data collection methods are discussed and evaluated.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lab 1, Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
GEOG 478/878
Pro-seminar in Latin American StudiesCrosslisted as ANTH 478/878, EDPS 478/878, HIST 478/878, LAMS 478, MODL 478/878, POLS 478/878, SOCI 478/878
Prereqs:
Junior standing and permission.
Topical seminar required for all Latin American Studies majors.
An interdisciplinary analysis of topical issues in Latin American Studies.
Credit Hours: 3
Max credits per degree: 6
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Regional Geography
Prereqs:
How cognitive processes help individuals to comprehend the spatial circumstances or arenas they confront when carrying out their daily activities. Awareness of space, spatial knowing, formation of cognitive maps, importance of spatial images in negotiation of surroundings, and the relationship of cognitive maps to orientation and wayfinding.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Techniques
GEOG 484/884
Water Resources SeminarCrosslisted as NRES 484/884, AGRO 884/484, GEOL 484/884, WATS 484
Prereqs:
Junior or above standing, or permission.
Seminar on current water resources research and issues in Nebraska and the region.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 491/891
Geography Field TourCrosslisted as NRES 491
Off-campus travel required.
Group educational tours to specific sites that illustrate aspects of physical and cultural geography.
Credit Hours: 2-3
Max credits per semester: 3
Max credits per degree: 6
Course Format: Field 40
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Physical Geography
Prereqs:
Permission.
Applying geographic training with on-the-job learning.
Credit Hours: 1-6
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Independent Study
Prereqs:
Topic varies, see course description or registration guide.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
Groups: Special Topics
How space, spatial structure, and spatially oriented behavior operate in social systems, emphasizing their influence on interpersonal communication and/or social exchange.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 899
Prereqs:
Admission to masters degree program and permission of major adviser
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 6-10
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Development of skills required for success in completing a graduate degree and forging a career as a geographer. Setting career goals, designing a graduate program, preparing research proposals, presenting research at professional conferences, reviewing professional literature and writing articles for publication.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lecture 2
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 902
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-2
Max credits per degree: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
History of geographical thought concentrating on the period since 1800. Emphasis on both the traditional and modern ways of viewing the nature of geography and to the linkages between them.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Course directly complements GEOG 903. Methodology or methods of explanation employed in geographic research and their relationship to the goals of the discipline. Problems, hypotheses, laws, theories, and models of a spatial nature.
Credit Hours: 2-3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
GEOG 815, 817, or permission
Review and examination of cartographic research on map design. Primary emphasis on efficiency and accuracy of maps as devices for spatial understanding and analytical cartography.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 922
Prereqs:
GEOG/NRES 812 and 822; or equivalent
Study of current research and trends in geographic information systems (GIS), GIScience, and GeoComputation. Advanced spatial analytical techniques and geospatial modeling emphasizing GIS applications in natural resources assessment, environmental analyses, agriculture, and land management.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Dispossession of the indigenous peoples of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States from a historical, spatial and interdisciplinary approach. Emphasis on human rights, including topics such as the legal assumptions of colonization, reduction of land holdings, population loss, resistance, and land claims.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Discussion of current literature and research on selected aspects of historical geography. Specific theme of course varies according to instructor.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Structure of settlement patterns and the factors influencing their development.
Credit Hours: 1-9
Max credits per degree: 9
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 967
Soil Genesis and ClassificationCrosslisted as AGRO 977, NRES 977
Prereqs:
AGRO 153, AGRO 877/GEOG 867, and permission
Procedures used to classify soils, concepts behind the systems in use, and the genesis of the soils in the major categories of each system.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 2, Recitation 1
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Senior-level masters degree candidate or PhD-level in human geography or design or planning or any of the social and behavioral disciplines or permission
GEOG 983 consists of a four, participant-led, research/discussion sessions. Environments as potentially significant components of behavioral episodes based on the premise that places, settings, or environments provide the contexts for and arenas within which people act, interact, and transact. Significance of the physical/sociocultural surrounds derived not solely from their physical presence, but from them, meaning attached to them, and their importance. Topics: common importance of person/environment relations to diverse interests concerned with individual and group behavior in everyday, natural settings; how people experience their environments or “environmental knowing” through perceptual/cognitive processes; environmental representations, images, schemas, and/or cognitive “maps”; and attributions of meaning and significance to environments.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
GEOG 994
Seminar in Anthropology and GeographyCrosslisted as ANTH 994
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
24 hrs geography and permission
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Max credits per degree: 24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Admission to doctoral degree program and permission of supervisory committee chair
(1-24, max 55)
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom