Law Courses

Courses of Instruction (LAW)

Filter these Courses

Course Formats
ACE Outcomes
LAW 501G
When taken for 6 credits, includes both LAW 501G and 502G. Basic principles governing the creation, interpretation and enforcement of private agreements. Offer and acceptance, consideration, the effect of changed or unforeseen circumstances, conditions and remedies.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 502G
For course description, see LAW 501G.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 503G
Torts ICrosslisted as EDAD 874
Legal protection afforded in civil proceedings against interference with the security of one’s person, property, relations, and other intangible interests. Substantive principles that govern tort claims (ranging from claims for intentional wrongdoing, to negligence claims, to claims that the defendant is strictly liable for harms caused to the plaintiff), and the theoretical bases and practical implications of such claims.
Credit Hours: 1-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 505G
Problems in possession, gifts of personal property, bona fide purchasers of personal property, estates in land, landlord and tenant, the modern land transaction, controlling the use of land, easements, licenses and equitable servitudes and constitutional limitations on the power of government to restrict individual economic liberties.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 506G
For course description, see LAW 505G.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Max credits per degree: 6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 508G
Criminal LawCrosslisted as EDAD 970
Substantive criminal law, focusing on the theoretical foundations, general principles, and doctrines that govern the rules of liability and defenses, both in the common law tradition and under the Model Penal Code.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The emphasis of this course is on the development of legal research and writing skills; writing is the lawyer’s most commonly used skill, and effective writing rests on effective research. Communicating like a lawyer, however, means not only communicating professionally but also conducting oneself ethically. In addition to providing sustained and intensive instruction on legal research and writing, this course introduces students to many facets of professionalism and to the skills necessary to make ethical and professional choices.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lecture 2
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The emphasis of this course is on the development of legal research and writing skills; writing is the lawyer’s most commonly used skill, and effective writing rests on effective research. Communicating like a lawyer, however, means not only communicating professionally but also conducting oneself ethically. In addition to providing sustained and intensive instruction on legal research and writing, this course introduces students to many facets of professionalism and to the skills necessary to make ethical and professional choices.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Format: Lecture 4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to federal and state court organization, jurisdiction, and procedure. Emphasis on pre-trial, trial, and post-trial procedures, including pleading, enforcement of judgements, motion practice, appellate review, and the effects of res judicata and collateral estoppel.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
For course description, see LAW 516G.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prepare for legal practice in a global legal environment, including an understanding of how to handle the treaty and foreign law issues that can arise in the practice of virtually every area of law. The sources of international law and the relationship of international law (particularly treaties) to the U.S. legal system. An overview of conflict of law rules, a survey of differences in the major legal systems of the world, and comparative examination of how foreign legal systems regulate other areas of law studied in the first year, such as torts, contracts, property, and civil procedure.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Narrative account of ideas and practices surrounding the attribution of criminal responsibility in America from colonial to modern times. Tensions between formal rules of law and social attitudes, manner in which tensions relate to criminal trial history, relationship between evolution of punishment ideas/practices and evolution of criminal justice. Broad-based social, political and intellectual history of American criminal justice.
Credit Hours: 2
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 602G
This course will address the legal concerns and issues facing the rapidly growing subpopulation of older adults. Topics covered in the course will include the legal and social science aspects of: ethical issues related to client legal capacity, health care decision making, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, long-term informal and formal care (including guardianship), financial aspects of aging, ageism, and elder maltreatment.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 603/603G
Issues confronted by the small firm and/or sole practitioner. Firm organization, e.g., partnerships, professional corporations, limited liability companies, limited liability partnerships and partnership and shareholder agreements. The role of partners, shareholders, associates and non-lawyer staff, e.g., law clerks paralegals and legal secretaries. Ethical issues involved in the marketing of legal services, firm financial matters and dealing with clients within the organizational structure. Managing the legal product as well as physical resource needs such as traditional libraries through electronic information resources.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lecture 2
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 609G
Constitutional Law ICrosslisted as EDAD 870
Structure of the federal government, including the history and judicial interpretation of the Constitution, federalism, interstate commerce, due process, equal protection, and separation of powers.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Appellate practice and procedure; exploring the federal and Nebraska appellate practice, including the mechanics and timing of appeals, with emphasis on written and oral advocacy. Students draft appellate briefs, prepare other appeal-related documents, and participate in an oral argument.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Issues that United States courts face when international disputes arise. Jurisdiction, international service, international evidence gathering, extraterritorial application of United States domestic law, the act of state doctrine, foreign sovereign immunity, and enforcement of international judgements. Resolving conflicts through arbitration and comparative perspectives about methods of resolving international commercial disputes.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Participation on Blackboard required. There are no prerequisites, although students who have taken a Uniform Commercial Code course will find that helpful. Issues arising in electronic commerce, including setting up a business in cyberspace, the privacy issues associated with online data collection, and the laws governing the sale of goods, licensing, secured transactions and payments in an electronic environment. A variety of state, federal and international legislation and directives will be considered, including the Communications Decency Act, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the USA Patriot Act of 2001, the financial privacy provisions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, digital signature statutes and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 614G
Legal doctrine and policy as it relates to the democratic political process. Text of the Constitution and federal legislation that governs voting and the political process, the decisions of the United States Supreme Court interpreting the Constitution and federal statutes, and the federal regulations that impact our democracy. Campaign finance, the Voting Rights Act, “one person, one vote,” racial and partisan gerrymandering, direct democracy, the regulation of political parties, and the Help America Vote Act. Where the law of our democracy has been, where it is today, and where it might be headed.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
A comprehensive survey and analysis of the laws governing the entertainment industry, artists, and their representatives.  Students will learn about legal restraints on entertainment, including censorship of sex and violence, defamation, and privacy and publicity rights.  We will also cover intellectual property in entertainment assets: copyright, trademark, artistic credits, and “moral rights.”  Students will acquire a working vocabulary of important entertainment transactions, such as publishing agreements, film and television option agreements, and agent and personal management contracts.  The course includes hands-on analysis of entertainment contracts, especially in the publishing, movie, and television industries. The lectures also feature examples of real-life, practical knowledge from Professor Dooling's misadventures in Hollywood doing screenwriting and television production, and his publishing industry experiences as an author, novelist, and journalist.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students previously enrolled in Seminar (707G) may not enroll in this course. Historical, political, religious and philosophical roots of international human rights law, its development over the course of the last century and its contemporary role in international affairs. May include: current attempts to strengthen U.N. fact-finding and implementation mechanisms; the relationship between U.N. peacekeeping and peacemaking and international humanitarian law; the activities of regional human rights systems; the effect of the United State’s recent signature and ratification of U.N. human rights conventions and the role of such conventions and international human rights law through the criminal process; and military intervention to protect human rights victims, including NATO’s intervention in Kosovo.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Major facets of the construction process. Project concept stage, terms and provisions of the construction contract, contract execution stage, performance stage, disputes and relationships among the contracting parties, and architect-engineer.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 619/619G
Constitutional HistoryCrosslisted as EDAD 977
American constitutional history with a focus on "transformative" moments at which the Constitution and the nature of American politics and government changed. American Revolution and the framing of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, Civil War and Reconstruction, and the New Deal. Exploration of the courts and how they stood on history and original intent when they interpret the Constitution.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Course Format: Lecture
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Analysis of the role of science in the law. This seminar will explore issues such as biotechnology, computers, scientific evidence, regulatory approval, antitrust, and environmental law to explore the intersection of science, technology, and the effect on the law and legal decision making.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 621G
Education Law SeminarCrosslisted as EDAD 968
Selected current national and state legal issues pertaining to education.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Key theories in environmental ethics and environmental law; enhanced ability to analyze critically and communicate clearly and persuasively in an interdisciplinary forum through writing, informal discussion, and formal presentations; and a deeper understanding of sustainability as a principle of environmental law and ethics especially in agriculturally dominated landscapes. Nature of ethics and its relation to law; climate change; bio-fuels with implications for farm communities, water resources, and food supplies; and genetically modified organisms (GMO's).
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 624G
History of immigration to the United States, federal authority to regulate immigration, immigrant visas, nonimmigrant visas, deportation, political asylum, citizenship, rights of aliens in the United States, and ethical issues for immigration lawyers.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The protection of literary, artistic, musical, and audiovisual works under the laws of copyright and unfair competition. Rights in computer programs, characters, titles, and useful articles. Home recording, photocopying, computer uses/Internet, and public performance.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course focuses on cutting-edge legal issues related to family law and policy. Topics may include the regulation of reproduction, sexuality and family formation, but will largely be dictated by family law controversies in the courts at the time of the course. Family Law is not a pre-requisite for this course.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 2.5
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 627G
Negotiable instruments, bank collections, negotiable documents, selected aspects of sales, and products liability.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 628G
Antitrust and Trade RegulationCrosslisted as ECON 828
Control of business activities through the federal antitrust laws. Emphasis on monopolies, joint ventures, pricefixing, boycotts, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing and tying arrangements, territorial restrictions, and mergers.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Those who had accounting as undergraduates may enter only with the permission of the instructor. Basic accounting principles and the interaction of law and accounting. Understanding of accounting statements and terminology likely encountered in legal practice.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 630G
Family LawCrosslisted as CYAF 950
The family examined as a socio-legal entity with respect to its creation, dissolution, and the problems incident to its continuation, including interspousal rights and duties and the relationship between parents and children.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Basic problems of criminal procedure with emphasis on the fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments to the United States Constitution and their impact on the criminal justice system.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to the law of business associations. The relationships among the various participants in business entities and, to a lesser extent, the relationships between business entities and outsiders. Corporations and partnerships.
Credit Hours: 3-4
Max credits per degree: 4
Course Format: Lecture
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 633G
Administrative LawCrosslisted as ECON 886
Origin and growth of the administrative process, the development of administrative law and its impact upon traditional legal institutions, analysis of the types of federal and state administrative tribunals, their powers and functions, and problems of administrative procedure, judicial and other controls upon the administrative process.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 634G
Legal issues encountered in the development of oil and gas reserves.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
A limited enrollment class. Students required to write a paper on selected family law topics with emphasis on interdisciplinary research. Family law practice skills such as interviewing, counseling, negotiations, mediation, drafting, evaluating property, tax problems, litigation, working with other professionals, and interacting with juveniles.
Credit Hours: 1-5
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Corporate mergers and acquisitions, including tender offers. The history of corporate acquisitions, their rationales, the legal duties of the officers and directors involved, different ways to structure a corporate acquisition, issues in negotiation and contracting, and securities law issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 637G
Taxation-Individual IncomeCrosslisted as ACCT 837
The structure and content of the federal income tax system, focusing on taxation of individuals. Income, deductions, income splitting, capital gains, and tax accounting. Technical proficiency in solving tax problems and an understanding of the tax policy decisions implicit in the technical rules.
Credit Hours: 3-4
Max credits per degree: 4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 639G
Intestate succession and related matters, execution of wills, revocation of wills, problems created by the time gap in wills, limitations on the power to devise, construction of wills (mistake and ambiguity), the elements of trust, formalities in the creation of a trust, the interest of the beneficiary, charitable trusts, and problems of trust administration.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 641G
Environmental LawCrosslisted as AECN 841
Legal problems encountered as a result of the impairment of the quality of the environment. Control of air, water, land, noise, and radiation pollution, and the roles of federal, interstate, state, and local agencies in affording protection. Includes private actions, class actions, and regulatory actions to protect both private and public interests.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 642G
Legal and constitutional concepts involved in choosing the applicable law when the essential facts of a case are not confined to one state or national sovereignty.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 643G
Selected topics in tort law. Advanced class in tort law, considering the general legal theory of tort, as well as specific topics not studied in detail during the required first-year torts class. May include tort claims other than the intentional torts, negligence, and products liability--i.e., defamation, nuisance, privacy, abuse of legal process, interference with advantageous relationships, tort claims implied from statutes, the prima facie tort, and others. May also include topics relating to the functioning of tort law in social context--e.g., the efficiency with which tort litigation accomplishes its apparent purpose, alternative legal mechanisms to reduce risk or promote safety, alternative systems of compensating for harms, legislative tort reform initiatives, and others.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Creditors’ remedies outside of bankruptcy, secured financing of personal property, and the impact of federal bankruptcy law on secured creditors.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Course Format: Lecture
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 645G
Unfair CompetitionCrosslisted as ECON 829
Federal and state statutory provisions and common law doctrines restricting unfair methods of competition. Includes the law of trademarks, trade secrets, misappropriation, false advertising, disparagement, and the role of the FTC in regulating deceptive practices, together with brief introductions to copyright and patent law.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 646G
EvidenceCrosslisted as EDAD 971
Relevancy and admission of evidence, including hearsay, opinions, privileges, other exclusionary rules, examination of witnesses, judicial notice, and physical evidence.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 647G
Analysis of the employment relationship as it has developed outside of the collective bargaining context. History and current status of the employment relationship, including discharge-of-will, occupational safety and health, minimum wage/maximum hour legislation, unemployment compensation and noncompetition agreements.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 648G
Business PlanningCrosslisted as ACCT 848
Prereqs:
LAW 632/G, 638/G
Series of separate, rather detailed planning problems. Each problem calls for the selection and planning of a transaction to meet the needs of the parties involved, in light of applicable corporate, partnership, tax, and securities considerations.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 649G
Mass Communications LawCrosslisted as EDAD 978
In-depth focus on the first amendment. Includes legal distinctions between the print and broadcast media, free press and fair trial, access to media, and licit and illicit ideas.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Introduction to the US federal income tax rules that apply to US persons (including corporations, partnerships and individuals) living or doing business abroad or receiving income from foreign sources, and to foreign persons living or doing business in the US or receiving income from US sources. Effect of US tax treaties on these rules.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to major families of legal systems outside the common law orbit. Emphasis is on Western European and Socialist (Marxist) legal systems; others treated less intensively.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Completion of the survey course in immigration law is helpful, but not required
Each student will be required to write a 15 page paper for the course. This paper requirement will not fulfill the Law College seminar requirement for graduation. Introduces students to US refugee and asylum law. Refugee issues in the context of domestic and international political environments. Asylum reform, gender-based persecution, persecution of lesbians and gays, deficiencies in international and domestic refugee law, and firm resettlement of displaced persons. With an interdisciplinary focus, interplay among political, social, economic, cultural and psychological phenomena as refugees, governments of host countries, and international and nongovernmental organizations interact in the context of ongoing crises around the world. Contrasting viewpoints discussed. Along with relevant substantive law and procedure, participation in simulations designed to teach practical skills necessary to an asylum and refugee law practice, including working with translators, interviewing and case advocacy. Asylum cases serve as the foundation for role play exercises.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 654G
Major foreign legal systems and their impact on US law, lawyers and clients. Compares the Anglo-American common law system with the civil law systems of continental Europe; surveys other major foreign legal systems (e.g. Muslim, Hindu, Japanese, Chinese, African and Socialist legal systems); and addresses proof and pleading problems that arise when foreign law is at issue in US courts.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Law governing the sale of goods with emphasis on Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Includes: contract formation; acceptance and rejection of goods; warranties; risk of loss; remedies, including non-Uniform Commercial Code remedies in consumer transactions; documentary sales and leases.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 656G
Law of commercial banking. History and structure of the American banking system; the formation of a new bank; the regulation of traditional banking activity, including lending limitations; reserve requirements; capital adequacy; equal credit laws; failed banks; branch banking; and future trends in banking.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students fulfill the course requirements through writing a paper, participating in class, presenting their research to the class, and completing several exercises. Students will learn to use computer statistical software packages (SPSS) for these exercises.
Introduction to one of the fastest growing areas of legal scholarship and practice — the use of empirical techniques in research and litigation.  Learning how to be sophisticated and critical consumers of empirical research that lawyers and experts often use to resolve legal cases and controversies, to shape legislation, and to use as argument in public policy debates. Introduction to survey research methodology, designing and conducting experiments, data gathering and analysis through descriptive and inferential statistics.  In addition to discussing how to perform these techniques, students read cases and articles in which each of the techniques has played an important role. The course introduces law students to the social sciences through a “hands on” approach.  Students will collect and analyze their own data by completing small research projects related to their areas of interest.  Class sessions include discussion of social science and legal materials, lectures on the basics of empirical analysis, assistance with analyzing statistical data with computer packages, assistance with interpreting data, and student presentations.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Law 632G and 637G.
Students, under close faculty supervision, advise and represent startup business clients in a variety of early-stage legal matters, including entity formation, contract drafting and review, intellectual property protection, real estate, financing, regulatory, compliance and other transactional matters.  Participation in a concurrent seminar concentrating on the development of skills necessary to effectively advise entrepreneurial clients is required.  Limited enrollment pursuant to a written application process that occurs in the prior semester.
Credit Hours: 6
Course Format: Lab 5
Course Delivery: Classroom
Constitutions of the individual states, including: state expansion of individual rights, state-federal constitutional relationships, state innovations, “interpretation” theories in the state context, constitutions in contrast with statutes, balance of powers, processes of revision, and procedures relevant to the practitioner.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Analysis of the role of science in the law. This class will explore issues such as biotechnology, computers, scientific evidence, regulatory approval, antitrust, and environmental law to explore the intersection of science, technology, and the effect on the law and legal decision making.
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 661G
Public international air law, with emphasis on the Chicago Convention of 1944 and the International Civil Aviation Organization, the exchange of air traffic rights, and the aviation security treaties.  Selected areas of private international air law including international air carrier liability under the Warsaw and Montreal Conventions.  In addition to international aviation law, this course also examines various aspects of U.S. aviation law including liability and Federal regulation of the aviation industry.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Course Delivery: Classroom
Overview of the United States laws of copyright, patent, trade secret and trademark for students of all backgrounds and discussions of the laws and mechanisms to protect intellectual property rights abroad including analysis of all major international treaties and conventions. This course will cover not only the legal and regulatory schemes but also the policy implications. No prior course in intellectual property or science background is requisite.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 663G
Taxation-Individual Income IICrosslisted as ACCT 863
Most important tax principles affecting business and investments, as well as an introduction to basic tax procedure (both administrative and judicial), civil and criminal fraud, tax research, and certain ethical issues common in tax practice.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Credit toward the degree may be earned in only one of: Gender Issues in the Law (LAW 771/771G) and (LAW 664/664G), but not both. The role of gender, race, and class in shaping socio-legal relationships and policies. Selected procedural substantive areas of the law that affect and are affected by gender, race, and class. Employment, property, torts, constitutional law and contractual relationships, and the complex relationship between gender, race, class, and the law.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
LAW 671/G preferred; or LAW 640/G
Selected issues of international trade law and policy. Several prominent issues of international trade law and policy, including trade in agricultural goods, new issues facing the international trading system, and other topics selected by students for research papers. Visiting scholars, government officials, or faculty from other departments at the university may make presentations to the seminar.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Analysis of the legal rules and institutions used to address international environmental issues. Includes the sources and nature of international environmental law, extraterritorial application of domestic environmental law, transboundary pollution, sustainable development, protection of the global environment, and the impacts of international trade policy and international development policy on the environment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 667G
Legal principles in the construction area. Legal and equitable issues which result from the construction relationship and disputes relating to that relationship.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Regulation of international trade and investment by individuals, governments (particularly the United States) and international agreements.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Before registering for this course, a student must (1) obtain the approval of the faculty member involved and (2) submit the Research in a Selected Field form to the College of Law registrar. Absent the prior approval of the dean, no student may take more than 6 hours of Research in a Selected Field and/or Psycholegal Research. Individual study under the supervision of a faculty member.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Before registering for this course, a student must (1) obtain the approval of the faculty member involved and (2) submit the Research in a Selected Field form to the College of Law registrar. Absent the prior approval of the dean, no student may take more than 6 hours of Research in a Selected Field and/or Psycholegal Research. For course description, see LAW 669G.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students who have taken LAW 668G may not enroll in this course. This class may be taught in alternate years with International Trade and Transactions. Central theme of this field of law is the tension between generally accepted economic theories which support free trade as a means of increasing economic efficiency and raising standards of living for all trading partners, and the non-economic objectives that must be balanced against those principles. Includes: international monetary, development and trade policy; customs law, legal restraints on fair and unfair international trade practices; international transfers of intellectual property rights; and the regulation of foreign investment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 672G
JurisprudenceCrosslisted as EDAD 973
What is good and what is bad about law; the judicial process; principal schools of jurists; theories of the nature of law and the legal order; the American social system and the law; obligations to obey or to disobey the law; and ideas of justice.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students who have taken LAW 668G may not enroll in this course. Regulation of international trade by private parties through contractual arrangements. Contract formation and interpretation; dispute resolution; letters of credit and other transfers of payment; insurance; transportation; and countertrade arrangements. Contract negotiating and drafting exercise.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 674G
Investigation of the relationship between children, the family, and the state. Both public and private law considerations with emphasis on the juvenile justice system and general considerations of children’s constitutional rights.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Legal writing and analysis and experience with a variety of forms of legal writing. Topics selected from appellate brief writing and oral advocacy, interpreting and drafting statutes and rules, drafting jury instructions, drafting contracts, drafting pleadings, motion practice, drafting interrogatories, general correspondence, opinion letters, drafting wills and trusts, and advanced legal research.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Examination of the areas of law that impact animal agriculture.  Legal regimes that implement governmental policy concerning animal welfare, animal-based medical research, food safety, consumer information, international trade, and environmental impacts.  Examination of the underlying scientific foundation for these policy concerns.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Format: Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 697G is not a prerequisite for this course. Students who have taken LAW 641G may not enroll in this course. Legal problems associated with the control of hazardous and toxic substances. Toxic torts and regulatory actions to protect private and public interests.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Basic Spanish language, writing and conversation skills required.
Build student’s legal vocabulary in Spanish which would include speaking, reading and writing.  Develop skills in specific areas of the law where Spanish speaking attorneys are especially needed such as immigration law, labor law, family law and criminal law.  Courtroom demeanor, communication with Spanish speaking clients and knowledge of the Spanish culture.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course examines the federal laws and regulations that govern food safety and food labeling shared by federal agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Students will have the opportunity to learn the history of federal food safety laws and enforcement and will discuss case studies highlighting current issues in the news, e.g., salmonella contamination of eggs, tort liability for “defective” foods, regulation of biotechnology use in foods, and the science underlying food safety regulation and food production. The course will conclude with analysis of the policy goals and implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act signed into law by President Obama on January 4, 2011, which provides for a new system of federal oversight of domestically produced and imported foods.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
The inequalities in American society which arise from employment discrimination against minorities and other under-represented groups, how these inequalities are reinforced and at times created by laws, and how law can be used to remedy many of these inequalities. (Formerly known as Legal Control of Discrimination
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 681G
Areas in which the law interacts with the Internet and the increasing digitization of information. Possible topics: commercial law issues arising out of e-commerce including the proposed Article 2B of the Uniform Commercial code on information licensing and various electronic signature statues; intellectual property issues including the regulation of the Internet, the domain name as a trademark controversy, database protection schemes, and issues relating to online liability for copyright and trademark infringement; privacy issues such as encryption of data and access to personal identification data; criminal law issues involving cybercrimes (e-mail theft, cyberrape, etc.); and Y2K problems.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Legal issues pertaining to the legal control of discrimination.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Two separate components; one involving patent law and one involving international intellectual property. The patent law component looks at some of the central issues of the protection and enforcement of patents with emphasis on the policy issues that arise from patent protection. Focus of the international intellectual property component is on private law. Materials emphasize issues that an American lawyer representing an American company should understand. Relative emphasis between patents and international intellectual property determined each term.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Role of law in controlling, shaping, and responding to scientific and technological developments in the field of medicine and the biological sciences. May include contraception, abortion, sterilization, artificial conception, genetic engineering, the right to refuse treatment, euthanasia, the right to treatment of defective newborns, organ transplantation, and experimentation with human subjects.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Legal doctrine and policy regarding capital punishment in the United States. Draws heavily but not exclusively on decisions by the US Supreme Court. Includes: various Constitutional challenges and limitations according to Supreme Court decisions; aggravating and mitigating circumstances; jury selection and qualification; discriminatory application; the use of clinical testimony; and the role of counsel. Differs significantly from the Jurisprudence course that addresses capital punishment and directs primary attention to jurisprudential arguments regarding the justification of capital punishment in principle and in practice, with only secondary attention to a few of the central court cases. Court cases and legal doctrine and policy issues arising out of those court cases. Thus, the two courses are complimentary with relatively little overlap, and neither presupposes the other.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Critical review of the role of gender in shaping socio-legal relationships and policies. Examines selected procedural and substantive areas of the law that affect and are affected by gender. Includes, but are not limited to, employment, property, torts, the Constitution and contractual relationships. Emphasis on the complex relationship between gender, race and class.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Pre- or coreq: LAW 632/G. Survey of the regulation of mutual funds and investment advisers under the federal Investment Company and Investment Advisers Acts.
Credit Hours: 2
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduces two theoretical frameworks applicable to anti-discrimination law and uses them to examine efforts to curb discrimination against women and men. Feminist Legal Theory and Masculinities Theory are used as foundations through which students can analyze whether legal controls on discrimination are effective. Specific topics that may be discussed include the law as it is related to the military (male mandatory registration and female integration); obscenity (pornography and art); family (custody-related sex preferences and family structure); crime (rape and sex work); education (Title IX athletics and single-sex education); and employment (sex-specific work).
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Contracts for the sale of land; real estate financing including mortgages and installment land contracts, and more advanced devices such as sale leasebacks, ground leases, leasehold mortgages, equity participations, variable rate mortgages, and others; title examination and protection; shared facilities such as cooperatives, condominiums, and home owners associations.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Institutional, economic, and legal dimensions of “health insurance”. Although the course considers the interface between private and public insurance mechanism, the focus is on private sector developments in “managed care”.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Legal aspects of commercial real estate practice including acquisition, disposition, financing, and management of commercial real estate entities such as apartment complexes, housing subdivisions, condominiums, and shopping centers. Land use controls.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The method used by state and local governments to raise revenues and how the U.S. Constitution limits their choices. Specifically, the evolution of interstate commerce (and specifically electronic commerce) has impacted state and local governments and how those governments are seeking new ways to finance themselves. The structure of state income, sales, and property taxes.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 693G
Law and EconomicsCrosslisted as AECN 893
Economic principles to problems of legal interpretation and policy. Gives economic background for substantive courses in such areas as antitrust, regulated industries, and environmental law and also demonstrates the power of economic analysis when applied to problems in such diverse areas as contracts, property, torts, criminal law, family law, corporations, taxation, securities, procedure, and constitutional law.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 694G
Selected legal issues affecting amateur and professional sports. May include applicability of antitrust, communications, contract, labor, and tax laws to professional sports; the ethical and professional aspects of player representation; the extra-governmental regulation of amateur athletics; and the internal organization of the professional sports leagues.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 695G
Law and Educational AdministrationCrosslisted as EDAD 959
Current legal issues of national significance relating to educational institutions; analysis of constitutional provisions, statutes, and court decisions affecting education; separation of church and state; rights of equality; student rights, responsibilities, and discipline; application of criminal and juvenile provisions; use of school property; control of the curriculum and extracurricular activities; contractual and tort liability; hiring, collective actions, tenure, outside activities, discharge, and retirement of teachers; confidentiality; accrediting agencies; and similar current legal matters.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to the basics of legal interviewing (lawyer interaction with a client for the purpose of identifying the client’s problem and gathering information on which the solution to that problem can be based) and counseling (a process in which lawyers help clients reach decisions). Class discussion of reading materials and videotaped demonstrations, and role play exercises.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 697/697G
Introduction to the basic principles of the law of patents in the United States including the history, utility and function of the patent system; statutory and procedural requirements for patentability; recent case law; and patent enforcement mechanisms, remedies and defenses. Foundation in patent law for general legal practice that crosscuts all potential business client interests from individual inventors to small and large companies.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Acquisition and disposition of the public domain; jurisdiction over public lands; withdrawals and reservations; mining and mineral leasing on public lands; range, forest, and wildlife management, recreation, and preservation.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 699G
Land Use PlanningCrosslisted as ECON 827
Legal and administrative aspects of the regulation of land use and development, the problems and techniques of urban planning at the various levels of government, and the relationship of private owners and builders to the government policies involved in shaping the physical environment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Analysis of specific issues in the design and control of market and governmental mechanisms for the diversification of risk.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
LAW 671/G, 673/G, or 640/G
Students previously enrolled in Seminar (665/G) may not enroll in this course. Two night sessions of three hours each for a negotiation exercise that will take the place of six class sessions. Selected issues of international trade law and policy. Several prominent issues: trade in agricultural goods, new issues facing the international trading system, and other topics selected by students for research papers. Visiting scholars or government officials or faculty from other departments at the university may also make presentations to the seminar.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 703G
Major topics at the intersection of law and medicine in America today. Most relate to the legal implications of health care quality and cost, to the legal implications of access to health care, or to issues in the area of bioethics. In particular, time devoted to the organization and legal credentialling of health care providers, individual and institutional; to medical malpractice law and its reform; to legal mechanisms of cost-control in health care delivery; to publicly-subsidized health care for the needy; and to the medicolegal issues surrounding morally controversial topics in modern medicine, such as issues relating to facilitating or avoiding reproduction, to the right to treatment, to the right to refuse treatment, to yet other issues.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 704G
Agricultural LawCrosslisted as AECN 804
Legal problems and issues of unique importance to lawyers serving the agricultural sector. The Farm Credit System, the Farmers’ Home Administration, and farm financing problems under the Uniform Commercial Code; commodity futures markets; agricultural cooperatives; farmland preservation and rural land use controls; foreign investment in American agriculture; farm labor legislation; farm programs and the economic regulation of agriculture; pesticides; and food additives.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Selected problems in agricultural law.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Rural Development and Energy Law Seminar (Law 706)(3 credit hours) This course will cover specific laws and regulations, as well as business and policy considerations, that inform efforts to develop rural infrastructure, stimulate jobs, establish community-based financial and non-profit institutions, and encourage rural entrepreneurship. Particular emphasis will be placed on how energy law and policy may be shaping the rural future. This course will also include a comparative element, with literature from the Law and Development movement, international development, and the affordable housing and urban renewal contexts considered in conjunction with current rural development concerns.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students required to write a substantial research paper on a topic of their choice. Interested students have the opportunity to research subjects of relevance to the work of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Historical, political and philosophical roots of international human rights law, its development over the course of the last century and its contemporary role in international affairs. May include current attempts to strengthen UN fact-finding and implementation mechanisms; the relationship between UN peacekeeping and peacemaking, on the one hand, and international humanitarian law, on the other; the activities of regional human rights systems; the effect of the United States’ recent signature and ratification of UN human rights conventions and the role of such conventions, and international human rights law generally, in US courts; and contemporary efforts to enforce international human rights law through the criminal process.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Theoretical, practical, ethical and legal issues confronted by mediators, arbitrators, neutral evaluators, and other dispute resolution specialists and the parties they serve. Legal context within which alternative forms of dispute resolution take place. Procedures examined: agreements arising from negotiations, mediations, arbitrations, summary jury trials, mini-trials, private judges, early neutral evaluations, neutral experts and masters, negotiated rulemaking, and claims facilities. Status of these procedures examined in light of existing case and statutory law and from a public policy point of view. Issues: confidentiality and privilege, conflicts of interest, finality/enforceability of resolutions, liability and ethical standards applicable to third parties, the extent of judicial review of decisions, arbitrability of disputes, international law, and public interest concerns. Disputes in a variety of settings considered: family, employment, medical, commercial, criminal, and international.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 709G
law, process, and skills; federal and state laws; commercial, labor, employment, securities, construction, international, and court-annexed arbitration; and other topics related to arbitration.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 710G
Process in which a trained neutral third party assists others in resolving a dispute or planning a transaction. Training in basic mediation skills through readings, demonstrations, simulations, and the keeping of a mediation notebook. The nature of mediation and its relationship to other forms of dispute resolution, the nature of conflict, models and styles of mediation, negotiation theory, communication skills, the interest-based mediation process, the representation of clients in mediation, special issues relating to attorney mediators, and mediators standards and ethics.
Credit Hours: 4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 711G
Protection of literary, artistic, musical, and audiovisual works under the laws of copyright and unfair competition. Rights in characters, computer programs, nonfiction works, titles, and useful articles, in addition to more traditional subject matter such as art, literature, and music; issues of infringement including home recording, photocopying, computer transmission and public performance; procedural aspects of the 1976 Copyright Act, including notice, registration, transfer and duration.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Interdisciplinary study of the relations between law and literature, exploring the law in literature and the law as literature. The law in literature: Novelists, poets, and playwrights have seen the human interest in the law and in legal events; the law and lawyers have therefore been central to some major works of literature. Examines ways the law and lawyers have appeared in literature, and attempts to draw some lessons from them. The law as literature: Primary and secondary writing in the law employs most of the literary devices found in the imaginative literatures, and the tools of literary interpretation and analysis can therefore be brought to bear on legal texts. Exploring the literary aspects of the law, and deriving practical and theoretical insights from this exploration.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Skills course. Requires as much practical writing as reading and study. Discusses various causes of poor legal writing-legal writing that is unnecessarily difficult to read-and attempts to understand what constitutes good legal writing, and what makes it work. Focuses on developing clarity, coherence, and concision in legal writing. Students should develop a better understanding of the linguistic causes of good and bad legal writing, and a set of concrete writing tools for the improvement of their own writing.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Selected problems of international and comparative gender issues in foreign legal systems and their impact on US law. Specific documents that may be discussed include the United States Constitution; US Refugee Law; Violence Against Women Act; International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; Universal Declaration of Human Rights; United Nations Charter; International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; Convention on the Rights of the Child; Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and the Declaration of the Elimination of Violence Against Women.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course will provide an introduction to several international law topics of current interest and special importance to the international community, particularly related to transnational criminal activities, terrorism, and international criminal law offenses.  Specific topics will include: the conclusion, interpretation and termination of international agreements; state sovereignty over land, sea and air; extraterritorial state criminal jurisdiction; nationality; extradition; international criminal law; war crimes; the International Criminal Court, and; the United Nations Charter regime and related structures, including the ad hoc international criminal tribunals
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Selected problems of international and comparative gender issues in foreign legal systems and their impact on U.S. law. Documents for discussion include the U.S. Constitution; U.S. Refugee Law; Violence Against Women Act; International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; Universal Declaration of Human Rights; United National Charter; International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; Convention of the Rights of the Child; Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 717G
The role that law plays in education in the United States. The rights of students and teachers, special education and disability, school finance, school searches, student discipline, privacy of records, liability of school officials and discrimination based on gender and race. The emerging case law on state constitutional claims of education equity and adequacy.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Refugee issues in the context of domestic and international political environments. Asylum reform, gender-based persecution, persecution of gays and lesbians, deficiencies in international and domestic refugee law, and firm resettlement of displaced persons. Interdisciplinary focus: considers the interplay among political, social, economic, cultural and psychological phenomena as refugees, governments of host countries, and international and non-governmental organizations interact in the context of ongoing crises around the world.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Law & Liberty in Time of Crisis Seminar (Law 721)(3 credit hours) An examination of constitutional rights and limits on liberty during times of crisis. The foundation will be a review of selected events such as the Alien and Sedition Acts, habeas corpus in the Civil War, the World War I Espionage Act, World War II internment of aliens, the Steel Seizure, the 1950's Red Scare, and the Pentagon Papers. Students will use this foundation to prepare a seminar paper addressing a selected issue about law and liberty under post-9/11 legislation and executive action
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
Environmental law in agriculture, the Clean Water Act as it applies to agriculture, the environmental and conservative provisions of the farm program, pesticide regulation and liability, and other areas where environmental concerns and the agriculture industry intersect.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Neither securities regulation or any knowledge of federal securities law is a prerequisite for this course.
Regulation of brokers and investment advisers by federal securities law: regulation of brokers under the Securities Exchange Act; regulation of investment companies under the Investment Company Act; and regulation of investment advisers under the Investment Advisers Act.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
A social justice critique of free markets. The relationship of legal rules to the distribution of wealth. Introduction of a range of materials and critique the economic theory underlying various approaches to law and economics. Readings will include an interdisciplinary perspective Current topics in economic inequality, e.g., access to credit, housing and others.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Legal framework applied in the U.S. to most wireline and wireless communications (not including the Internet). Cable television, landline telephone, broadcast and satellite radio and television, and mobile technologies. Economic, technological, national security, and statutory and constitutional issues, current policies, and academic debates.
Credit Hours: 1-2
Max credits per degree: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Major substantive and procedural issues in litigation to protect civil rights. Established theories of liability and defenses, possible new developments in legal doctrine, and pending statutory changes.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This seminar will examine the history of tribal gaming, the landmark case of California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, 480 U.S. 202 (1987) and the resulting Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA). Tribal gaming is regulated by tribal, federal, and state law and is a complex mix of issues: what constitutes a tribe and tribal lands; how do newly acquired lands become Indian Country; what is the role, structure, and authority of the National Indian Gaming Commission; what defines and distinguishes Class I, Class II and Class III gaming; how are tribal - state compacts formed; who may claim a portion of gaming revenues through fees or taxes; and what institutions and political players are crucial to the public debates on tribal and state revenue sharing, tribal economic development, and off-reservation casinos
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
This seminar will examine the history of tribal gaming, the landmark case of California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, 480 U.S. 202 (1987) and the resulting Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA). Tribal gaming is regulated by tribal, federal, and state law and is a complex mix of issues: what constitutes a tribe and tribal lands; how do newly acquired lands become Indian Country; what is the role, structure, and authority of the National Indian Gaming Commission; what defines and distinguishes Class I, Class II and Class III gaming; how are tribal - state compacts formed; who may claim a portion of gaming revenues through fees or taxes; and what institutions and political players are crucial to the public debates on tribal and state revenue sharing, tribal economic development, and off-reservation casinos.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 732G
Constitutional Law IICrosslisted as EDAD 871
Emphasizes protected individual civil liberties. The origin and modern applicability of the state action concept in constitutional litigation; the scope of congressional power to enforce the post Civil War amendments; freedom of speech, association, and press; and constitutional principles enforcing the first amendment’s command that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Advanced exposure to the tools of legal research: the nature of and philosophies surrounding organization and production of the materials themselves.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Commercial space, telecommunications and cyber industries are global industries involving large amounts of international trade. Accordingly, export control regimes, both domestic and international, have a large impact on these industries.  The US export control regime, particularly the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), is of particular significance given the leading role of the United States in space, telecommunications and cyber industries.  This course will provide an extensive examination of ITAR, the Export Administration Act and related Executive Orders, as well as some discussion of international export control regimes influencing US laws and regulations, and the ongoing efforts to reform the US system.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Course Delivery: Classroom
Criminal procedure issues arising after a suspect’s arrest. “Trial” issues include pre-trial preliminary hearings and grand jury proceedings as well as trial questions relating to joinder and severance, representation of multiple defendants, treatment of incarcerated defendants (including bail), right to jury trial, the fair trial-free press conflict, right to speedy trial, and discovery. “Post-trial” issues include sentencing, appeal, post conviction remedies, and corrections. Professional responsibility of attorneys in criminal cases.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 736G
After surveying the rights of creditors and debtors under state law, considers the impact of bankruptcy upon secured and unsecured creditors and upon stockholders. The bankruptcy trustee’s avoiding powers are studied. Code Chapter 12: Adjustments of Debt for Family Farmers considered in some detail. Chapters 7, 11, and 13 liquidations and reorganizations surveyed with selected topics considered in depth. The negotiated settlements and “workout agreements” which characterize this area of practice emphasized.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students may also enroll in LAW 713G Style and Composition in Legal Writing for an additional hour of Law College credit. A limited but central topic in the larger field of health-care law-the law bearing on the relationship between a health-care provider and a patient. Surveys the legal rights and obligations of patients and their health care providers, individual and institutional. Covering qualification as a health care provider (institutional and individual licensure); the legal doctrines relating to the formation of provider-patient relationship; the locus of decisional authority in the relationship; the provider’s fiduciary duties to the patient (to deliver care of professionally acceptable quality [including traditional malpractice law], to avoid conflicts of interest, to respect the patient’s privacy, and to protect the confidentiality of medical information about the patient); the reciprocal obligation of the patient to take reasonable steps to assure payment and to comply with medical directives; and the legal doctrines relating to the termination of provider-patient relationships.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Selected legal issues under the bankruptcy code with an emphasis upon corporate and farm reorganizations. Includes the treatment of executory contracts and leases; avoidance of pre-bankruptcy transfers; business reorganizations under Chapter 11; farm reorganizations under Chapter 12; use, sale, and lease of property; obtaining credit during the pendency of bankruptcy proceedings; negotiation and drafting of post-petition credit arrangements; relief from the automatic stay; adequate protection of lienholders; and plan confirmation standards under Chapter 11 and Chapter 12.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 739G
Scope and content of federal crimes. Fraud and political corruption, drug trafficking, money laundering, organized crime, false statement, obstruction of justice and federal sentencing guidelines.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Course Format: Lecture
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 740G
Students expected to complete a journal which relates class discussions, lectures, readings, and personal experiences into a guide book for future negotiation practice. Variety of negotiation styles and an opportunity to apply these styles in a series of increasingly complex negotiation problems. Negotiation problems include plea bargains, personal injury cases, commercial negotiations, and labor management disputes. Strategic and psychological factors present in negotiation styles. To improve negotiation performance and broaden the repertoire of strategic and stylistic choices available to the student negotiator.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Application of procedural rules to the bringing and defending of civil law suits and on considering the tactical and strategic aspects of litigation. Weekly exercises on pleading, motion practice and discovery.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 742G
Civil actions for damages caused to investors by misrepresentations in securities markets. Specific topics vary.
Credit Hours: 1
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The interplay and choice of possible recoveries in property, personal, and business interest situations. Damages: object of an award in contract and tort, limitations on recovery, and elements of damage. Equity: specific performance and injunctions. Examines the place and scope of restitution in the remedial structure, theories of recovery in basic contract and tort situations including vendor and vendee relationships, conversion, personal injury, defamation, privacy, unfair competition and employer-employee relationships, and the use of legal and equitable remedies in modern codes.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course will examine the basic structure of American legislative institutions and the process of law-making with emphasis on legislative process and external influences shaping the consideration, composition, enactment and implementation of new laws. The course will draw on real-world, “hot topic” issues for various practical exercises, including the drafting of statutes and written comments for agency and congressional submission.  In addition, the course will familiarize students with various kinds of materials, including bills, committee reports, legislative rules, floor debates, and statutes.  Collectively, these exercises and readings will allow the class to fully explore and evaluate the legislative process in its various contexts.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to the theories and applications of modern corporate finance. The course will explore a range of topics, including: valuation theories; the efficient capital market hypothesis; risk, return, the capital asset pricing model, and arbitrage pricing theory; investment and financing decisions; optimal capital structure; the role of classical finance theory in legal decisions; and option theory.  Prerequisite: Business Associations or permission of instructor.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
The financial structure and governance of the modern corporation and other similar entities. Issues of valuation relating to the corporation enterprise, alternatives for managing corporate risk, sources of corporate funding, and right of competing corporate stakeholders. Legal duties imposed on corporate management, factors influencing management’s decisions, and how management can act to satisfy its duties and maximize corporate value.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 748G
Space law and policy for intelligence gathering and weaponization, telecommunications, satellite launch, space tourism, and remote sensing. Application of five major international space treaties to regulation of modern space activities and arms control agreements. New and growing problems of orbital debris, protection of in-space assets and terrorism.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
Students write and present a paper addressing an area of interest in commercial or banking law. Increasingly, attorneys are facing new legal dilemmas posed by several developments in commercial practices. Explores several current issues in commercial and banking law. Includes “Technology and the Uniform Commercial Code,” “Consumer Protection and the UCC,” “Banks and Community Needs” and various issues arising from proposed revisions to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Previous enrollment in an international law course recommended
Structural and organizational issues related to United States foreign policymaking such as separation of powers and federalism. United States foreign policy in substantive areas such as the war on terror, non-proliferation, trade, foreign aid, global warming, relations with the European Union, and relations with Latin America.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Law relating to pensions and employee benefits. The role of pensions and employee benefits in the compensation package, taxation of pensions, regulation of pension and benefit plans, ERISA fiduciary law, and issues relating to the termination of pension plans.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
The class will have a limited enrollment. Preference given to students who have earned at least 6 credits from the following courses: Civil Rights Litigation, Civil Rights Litigation Seminar, Employment Law, Employment Law Seminar, Labor Law, Labor Law Seminar, Legal Control of Discrimination, Legal Control of Discrimination Seminar, Pension and Employee Benefit Law, Public Employment Law. A modest bridge between classroom instruction in labor and employment law and real world practice in the area. Local practitioners collaborate with faculty member to formulate problems for the class and participate in several class sessions. Students engage in intensive analysis of issues arising out of the problems; they may be asked to prepare and discuss work products that fall anywhere on a continuum between the scholarly (such as law review-type analyses of complex issues) and the intensely practical (such as drafting interrogatories).
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 753G
Labor LawCrosslisted as ECON 880
Legislative and judicial patterns of the modern labor movement; the objectives of labor combinations; the forms of pressure employed for their realization and prevention; strikes, boycotts, picketing, and lockouts; the legal devices utilized in carving out the permissible bounds of damage suits involving labor activity; the labor injunction; the National Labor Relations Board; the nature of collective bargaining agreements; extra legal procedure for settling labor disputes-the techniques of mediation, conciliation, and arbitration.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 754G
Advanced study of United States constitutional law in the litigational context and focused on the power, history, and development of the federal judicial system and the distribution of power between the federal and state systems.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 755G
Products LiabilityCrosslisted as IMSE 801
Liability issues arising out of manufacturing defects, design defects and warning defects in various product categories. Specific issues related to product liability, such as identifying proper defendants, establishing causation and the issue of post-sale warnings. Broader policy questions about the role of litigation versus regulation in a democracy and a market economy.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
National and international regimes for regulating telecommunications and media communications by cable, phone and fiber, and by satellite, broadcast, and wireless. International lawmaking through the International Telecommunications Union and the World Trade Organization including international allocation of spectrum for wireless services and orbital slots for satellites as well as issues about international copyright and/or broadcasting and those surrounding submarine cables. Jurisdiction among different international and national bodies and conflicts among nation states. Historical regulation and how the convergence between telephone, television and computer services can upset existing regulatory apparatuses. Comparative analysis of different nations' communications policies. Exploration of how the United States addresses global communications issues, consideration of domestic U.S. regulations limiting, and setting a framework for foreign involvement in certain communications industries within the U.S.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 757G
Research is supervised and approved by a faculty member in the Law/Psychology program. Absent the prior approval of the Dean, only those students enrolled in the Law/Psychology Joint Degree Program may register for this course. Absent the prior approval of the Dean, no student may take more than 6 hours of research in a selected and/or psycholegal research. A substantial research and writing project on a psychological topic.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 758G
Research is supervised and approved by a faculty member in the Law/Psychology program. Absent the prior approval of the Dean, only those students enrolled in the Law/Psychology Joint Degree Program may register for this course. Absent the prior approval of the Dean, no student may take more than 6 hours of research in a selected and/or psycholegal research. For course description, see LAW 757G.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 759G
Employment Law SeminarCrosslisted as EDAD 956
Selected current national and state legal issues pertaining to private and public employment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 760G
This course has no description.
Course Format: Lecture 2
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 762G
Law and Behavioral ScienceCrosslisted as PSYC 985
General issues in the interaction between law and the behavioral sciences; discussion of the use/misuse/nonuse of the behavioral sciences in the law, with attention to ways of making behavioral science input most useful; analysis of the law as a behavioral instrument.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 763G
Mental Health LawCrosslisted as PSYC 988
Credit may only be earned in either LAW 763G or LAW 772G.
Critical review of the mental health laws throughout the nation and their psychological foundations. Emphasis on the research that illuminates the problems facing mental health law, system, and processes and the available solutions. Includes the insanity defense, competency to stand trial, guardianship, conservatorship, and civil commitment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 764G
Topics in Law and Psychology ICrosslisted as PSYC 989
May be repeated once. Analysis of specific psycholegal topics. Previous course titles include Privacy, Mental Health Policy, Legal Decision Making, Institutional Reform and Deinstitutionalization, Legal Policy and Child Development, and Domestic Violence.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 765G
Topics in Law and Psychology IICrosslisted as PSYC 989A
May be repeated once. For course description, see LAW 764G.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Implementation of international space treaties and other international space law by means of the establishment of national space legislation. Licensing regimes dealing with liability issues or other control mechanisms. Ways in which countries across the world have chosen to implement relevant international requirements as well as to assert national space policies by means of national law. Discussion of national U.S. law regarding satellite communications, satellite remote sensing, and space tourism.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 767G
Estate PlanningCrosslisted as ACCT 967
Prereqs:
Pre- or coreq: LAW 639/G. Federal estate and gift taxation, related income tax rules, estate planning concepts, and state inheritance taxation.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 769G
Tax Policy SeminarCrosslisted as ACCT 969
Policies of federal income taxation with emphasis on current legislative proposals and alternatives.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Critical review of gender role in shaping socio-legal relationships and policies. Procedural and substantive areas of the law that affect and are affected by gender. Employment, property, torts, Constitutional law, and contractual relationships. Complex relationship between gender, race and class.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Credit may only be earned in either LAW 763G or LAW 772G.
Critical review of the mental health laws throughout the nation and their psychological foundations. Emphasis on the research that illuminates the problems facing mental health law, system, and processes and the available solutions. Includes the insanity defense, competency to stand trial, guardianship/conservatorship, and civil commitment.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Criminal sanction with attention to conceptual and justificatory problems. Issues relating to the just administration of punishment, including the death penalty, as well as legal doctrines and defenses negating or mitigating criminal responsibility. Sentencing process considered with attention to the legal rights of offenders from conviction to final release.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 774G
Prereqs:
Permission
An interdisciplinary seminar with the Department of Civil Engineering. Contemporary environmental issues and water resource management.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Max credits per degree: 4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Judicial process, the principal schools of jurists, theories of the nature of law and the legal order, the problems of the science of law today, and their application to the American social system.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 776G
Water Law, Planning and PolicyCrosslisted as AECN 876
Judicial, legislative, and administrative problems in water resource development, allocation, and control.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 777G
Legislation SeminarCrosslisted as EDAD 963
Development of further skills in drafting and interpreting statutes, understanding legislative processes and decision making, and evaluating the role of legislation in governmental regulation. Opportunity for in-depth study of subjects pertaining to or involving legislation, centering on subjects considered by the Nebraska Legislature and the Nebraska legislative process.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Each student will be required to write a paper examining a Nebraska regulatory provision and considering whether that particular regulation should be eliminated or modified. A review of the policy arguments for and against government regulation and their application to particular regulatory provisions.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Selected constitutional issues of current importance.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Enrollment limited to 16 students per semester. Simulation exercises concerning advanced trial advocacy topics including jury selection, expert witnesses, problem witnesses, development of a trial theme and multi-party litigation. Students perform simulated jury trial.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 783G
Insurance LawCrosslisted as ECON 814
Principles of insurance law. Focuses on features of common insurance contracts and the legislative, judicial and administrative supervision of both insurance contracts and the insurance industry.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Overview of the development of establishment of the European Union and the current transition from the failed Constitutional Treaty to the new Reform Treaty. The unique character of the EC/EU as a half-way house between a classical intergovernmental organization and a federal state, respective roles of the Council the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the European Court of Justice in the process of law-making, regulations, directives, and decisions at the European level. Major substantive elements of EC law, such as the freedom of movement of goods, services, person, capital, and the competition regime.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Interaction between EC/EU and the European Space Agency in the development of European space activities and policies, in regard to EUTELSAT and EUMETSAT, and their institutional integration. The development of Galileo and the Global Monitoring for Environment Security project; general legislative and regulatory competencies of commercial space and satellite communications; gradual development of an internal market for SATCOM services.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Format: Lecture 1
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 788G
Local Government LawCrosslisted as EDAD 964
Law of local government units with emphasis on current problems in the operation and administration of local government, models and theories of local government.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
A comprehensive but intensive survey of the statutes and regulations governing the distribution of securities, trading of securities on the stock exchanges and the over-the-counter markets, and the growing role of federal law in corporate governance. Primary focus on the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, with limited attention to state “blue sky” securities legislation.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 790G
This course meets the faculty’s requirement for a course in professional responsibility. A systematic study of the principles of professional responsibility governing the practice of law in the United States.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 791G
This course is part of participation in the J.S.D. program. Students must generate progress reports each semester.
Research based on an aspect of law.
Credit Hours: 6
Max credits per degree: 24
Course Format: Independent Study
Course Delivery: Classroom
LAW 793G
Products Liability SeminarCrosslisted as ECON 830
Selected problems in products liability, with emphasis on research and writing projects analyzing the problems.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Concepts used historically to fit Native Americans into the legal structure of the United States. The power of the federal government, the power of the states, and the historical and contemporary power of the tribes explained.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Concepts used historically to fit Native Americans into the legal structure of the United States. The power of the federal government, the power of the states, and the historical and contemporary power of the tribes explained.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Paralell LAW 741G.
Open only to students with senior standing. Students are also required to attend a seminar on lawyering skills and the representation of clients. Students, under close faculty supervision, advise and represent clients in a variety of civil cases, including landlord-tenant, consumer, collection, bankruptcy, immigration, tax, and domestic relations cases.
Credit Hours: 2-6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Open only to students with senior standing. Participation in a seminar concentrating on the development of skills necessary to the prosecution and defense of criminal cases is required. Students prosecute a variety of misdemeanor offenses under the close supervision of a member of the faculty. Cases are prosecuted through the Lancaster County Attorney’s Office and the practice component of the course is conducted out of that office.
Credit Hours: 3-6
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom