Philosophy Courses

Courses of Instruction (PHIL)

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Course Formats
ACE Outcomes
Historical-cultural introduction to philosophy. Considers a broad range of philosophical problems in relation to the major historical and cultural conditions which have influenced their formulations and proposed solutions. Topics: the principles of rational inquiry; the nature of knowledge; the metaphysics of mind, world, and God; and the sources and authority of morality.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 8
Critical survey of current issues and the role of philosophy in attempts to resolve them. Recent topics: sexual morality, pornography and the law, capital punishment, sexism and racism, extraordinary treatment for the terminally ill, abortion, church and state, and nuclear war and disarmament.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 8, 9
Introduction to the principles of correct reasoning and their application. Emphasis on improving skills of thinking and reading critically, analyzing and evaluating arguments objectively, and constructing sound arguments based on relevant evidence.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 3
Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature and justification of religious belief. Issues include the conception of God in Judaism and Christianity; the role of faith, reason, and religious experience in religious belief; the traditional arguments for the existence of God; the problem of evil; the idea of immortality; the relations between religion and science and religion and morality.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Good standing in the University Honors Program or by invitation.
University Honors Seminar 189H is required of all students in the University Honors Program.
Topic varies.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to symbolic logic. The semantics and syntax of sentential and predicate logic. Translating into and from formal languages, determining the validity or invalidity of arguments, and constructing proofs within formal systems.
This course is a prerequisite for: PHIL 411, PHIL 412
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 3
PHIL 213
Philosophical study of moral problems in modern medicine, exploring such issues as the allocation of scarce medical resources, patients rights, research on human subjects, abortion, the care of seriously impaired newborns, and socialized medicine and the right to health care.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 8
Exploration of a number of topics to which both psychological research and philosophical reflection are relevant. Includes two kinds of cases: where psychological findings bear on the resolution of some traditional philosophical issues and where philosophical analysis and criticism can be helpful in understanding or assessing a psychological theory or finding.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Fundamental assumptions and philosophical foundations of varieties of feminist thought. Nature of gender, gender identity, sex differences, and the role of science in defining sex and gender.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 9, 5
Wide range of basic issues in ethical theory, typically including: the nature of justice; the objectivity of moral values; the source of moral obligation; and the conditions of the good life. Each issue approached through historically important texts such as Aristotle's Niocomachean Ethics, Kant's Groundwork, and Mill's Utilitarianism.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Basic concepts and problems of political theory. Freedom, equality, democracy, justice, and the relation of the individual to the state.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 8
Prereqs:
Good standing in the University Honors Program or by invitation.
Basic concepts and problems of political theory. Freedom, equality, democracy, justice, and the relation of the individual to the state.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Nature and grounds of historical knowledge; objectivity vs. subjectivity in the writing of history; historical explanation; and patterns in human history. Primary sources include Hegel, Marx, and Toynbee.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Ethical dimensions in human relations to the environment. What is the nature of moral value generally, and what are the range of things that are morally valuable? Are there things that are fundamentally morally valuable beyond humans or human happiness (i.e., sentient creatures, ecosystems, and species)? What is the right thing to do given various answers to such value questions?
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 8, 9
Philosophical problems of the law and of legal systems. Includes legal reasoning, judicial interpretation, legal language and definition, legal obligation, law and morality, and legal paternalism. Concepts of law, constitutionality, legislative intent, fair trial, criminal responsibility, punishment, fault, and strict liability. Applications to social issues of individual freedom, human rights, privacy, discrimination, and justice.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Beginnings of Greek philosophy: the pre-Socratics and the systems of Plato and Aristotle with emphasis on historical connections and the critical interpretation of texts.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Survey of the more important systems in Western philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with emphasis on historical connections and the critical interpretation of texts.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Introduction to the philosophical understanding of religion. Includes a number of views on the nature of God, on the possibility of knowledge of God's existence through either argumentation or religious experience, and on the relation between religion and morality.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 9
Prereqs:
Permission.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Introduction to some major problems of epistemology, with emphasis on the understanding and evaluation of the problems, rather than on learning what various philosophers have said about them. Treats such questions as the nature and scope of knowledge; the sources of knowledge in perception, memory, and reasoning; the nature of evidence and its relation to knowledge; the possibility of knowledge of the mental lives of others; the nature and justification of inductive reasoning; and the concept of causality and its relation to explanation.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Introduction to some main problems, and some central concepts, of metaphysics. Focuses on the nature of being and existence, and on various questions concerning the relations between different kinds of entities: minds and bodies, causes and effects, universals and particulars, etc.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs PHIL.
Major themes and classic texts in philosophy of language. The notion of meaning, the relationships between meaning and reference, meaning and truth, and the meaning and use of expressions.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Major problems in the philosophy of mind: the relation between the mental and the physical; the role of mental concepts in explaining human actions; the possibility of life after death; the concept of a person; the structure of character and personality; and the analysis of various important mental concepts, such as thought, belief, desire, emotion, sensation, and pleasure.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Critical analysis of the philosophical foundations of the sciences. Nature of theories, observation in science, the interpretation of theories, the scientific method, explanation, interfield relations, patterns of scientific development, and the role of philosophy in science studies in general.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 320
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Morality, considering the major views in normative ethics as well as a broad range of questions in theoretical ethics centering on the nature of morality and its place in human life.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 8
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Application of systematic moral theories to specific moral issues. Issues of social justice and environmental, journalistic and medical ethics.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 8
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Various competing contemporary philosophical approaches to issues of social justice, with special attention to issues of individual rights, political liberty, and distributive justice.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 8, 9
PHIL 327
Prereqs:
3 hrs PHIL.
Critical exposition of the main classical and contemporary theories of art: Expressionist, Formalist, and Representationalist. Theories considered in definition of art, of aesthetic judgment, of art criticism, and of aesthetic value. Examples drawn from painting, literature, music, and movies.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5, 7
PHIL 332
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Philosophy of Spinoza, focusing on his principal work, the Ethics. Various metaphysical and epistemological aspects of Spinoza's thought, including his ideas on the nature and existence of God, the relation between mind and body, and relations between language, truth and reason.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
An examination of the more important philosophical systems and dominant intellectual trends of the nineteenth century. Representative works of philosophers such as Fiche, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, and Mill will be studied.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Ancient and medieval theories of morality. Connection between self-interest and morality, what morality is, and pleasure.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Ancient and medieval knowledge, focusing on perception, faith, and thought.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Ancient and medieval metaphysical theories, focusing on persons, gods, and properties.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Development of 20th century philosophy in the English speaking world. Realism, skepticism, reference, and representation. Figures include Frege, Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, Lewis, and Ryle. Developments in each of the major fields of philosophy, including ethics.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Recent developments in continental philosophy, in particular of different forms of social criticism which it has generated. Includes discussion of Marxists, Foucault and other philosophers influenced by Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, the existentialists, and Derrida. The language of social science; the controversy between problems of the issue the ethics of and the relation.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
3 hrs philosophy or permission.
Development of American Pragmatism from 1870's to the present. Essential writings of C. S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey; other currents in American thought such as Critical Realism and Idealism; and contemporary philosophic views that continue the spirit of pragmatism.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 345
Modern European Jewish PhilosophyCrosslisted as JUDS 345
Prereqs:
3 hrs PHIL.
Survey of Jewish philosophy from the eighteenth century to the present. Works of Moses Mendelssohn, Hermann Cohen, Martin Buber, Emanuel Levinas, and others in relation to broad European intellectual movements such as existentialism and phenomenology.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 5
Prereqs:
Permission.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Permission.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 399H
Prereqs:
Open to candidates for degrees with distinction, with high distinction, and with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences.
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Philosophy major and permission of philosophy undergraduate advisor.
Central philosophical problems or the work of some significant philosopher. Reading of primary sources, the interpretation of philosophical texts, and the writing of research papers.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 10
PHIL 405/805
Introduction to some of the basic concepts and problems in the philosophy of language. Topics to be discussed include reference, definite descriptions, names, demonstratives, truth, meaning, speech acts, and the logic of expressions involving so-called “propositional attitudes.” Authors studied include Frege, Russell, Tarski, Austin, Grice, Strawson, Quine, Kripke, Kaplan and Davidson.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 409/809
Intensive study of basic problems in the Theory of Knowledge: the nature of knowledge, the analysis of perception and memory, the justification of induction, the problem of how one knows other minds, and the analysis of a prior knowledge. Readings from recent work.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 411/811
Prereqs:
PHIL 211 or equivalent.
PHIL 411 is a second course in symbolic logic.
The main metalogical results of the twentieth century. Completeness, compactness and undecidability of first-order logic; the Löwenheim-Skolem Theorem; axiomatic set theory; the Gödel incompleteness theorems; and non-classical logics.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 412/812
Prereqs:
9 hrs philosophy including PHIL 211 or equivalent or permission.
Syntax and model theory of quantified modal logic with applications to e.g., deontic logic, epistemic logic, and the philosophy of logic.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 414/814
Main problems in the philosophy of mind, including dualism and materialism, instrumentalism and eliminativism, wide and narrow content, qualia, and mental causation.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 418/818
Intensive study of main problems in metaphysics, especially universals and particulars, the relation of mind and matter, the categories of the real, criteria of identity, and existential propositions. Readings from recent philosophers.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
The epistemological character of the social sciences. Character and explanatory role of social scientific generalizations, various explanatory strategies for social matters, the continuity or discontinuity of the social sciences with the special sciences, the importance of interpretation, and the place of rationality.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Format: Lecture 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 423/823
Critical study of leading theories in ethics, with close attention to major works, chiefly modern and contemporary. Includes naturalism, intuitionism, emotivism, utilitarianism, Neo-Kantian ethics, and various current positions.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Critical study of main problems and leading theories in social and political philosophy. Origin and justification of political obligation, with emphasis on social contact theories; the nature and foundation of individual rights and the strength of these rights when they conflict with each other and with concern for the common good; the principles of social justice and the obligation to protect the welfare of others; and the concepts of personal autonomy, liberty, equality, and freedom. Readings from a combination of historical and recent work, and emphasis on relating the various issues to current problems in society.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 450/850
Advanced survey of ancient philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Aristotle, concentrating on central epistemological and metaphysical issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
Advanced survey of early European philosophy from the late renaissance through the Enlightenment, concentrating on central epistemological and metaphysical issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 471/871
Kant's philosophy and problems in the interpretation of his writings. Primary text is the First Critique.
Credit Hours: 3
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 496/889
Prereqs:
Open to graduate students and, with the consent of the instructor, to seniors and especially qualified juniors.
Library work and conferences.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Max credits per degree: 24
Course Format: Independent Study
Course Delivery: Classroom
ACE Outcomes: 10
Prereqs:
Permission from philosophy graduate adviser
Seminar for beginning graduate students whose primary goal is the development of basic philosophical skills such as the analysis of primary texts, the writing of philosophical papers, and sustained oral discussion. Readings include a significant number of important works drawn from diverse areas of philosophical inquiry. Class meetings devoted primarily to student presentations of reading materials and their own written work. Effective oral discussion on the part of the student required.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Intensive study of some main problems in the philosophy of science: explanation and prediction in the sciences, the nature of scientific laws, functional explanations in the biological and social sciences, the structure of scientific theories, the ontological status of theoretical entities, the reduction of scientific theories, the confirmation of scientific hypotheses, and value judgments in the acceptance of scientific hypotheses.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 899
Prereqs:
Admission to masters degree program and permission of major adviser
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 6-10
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 911
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 3
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 920
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 921
Prereqs:
Graduate standing in the humanities
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
Intensive discussion of one or more of the main problems of social and political philosophy. Variable content. Possible topics are: political obligation, the concept of political authority, natural rights, the public interest, the aims of the state, and distributive justice.
Credit Hours: 1-4
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 952
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 955
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 957
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 960
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
PHIL 971
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
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Course Delivery: Classroom
Prereqs:
Admission to doctoral degree program and permission of supervisory committee chair
This course has no description.
Credit Hours: 1-24
Max credits per degree: 55
Campus:
Course Delivery: Classroom