Journalism & Mass Communications

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  1. Intro

Journalism & Mass Communications

DESCRIPTION

The College of Journalism and Mass Communications offers majors in advertising and public relations, broadcasting and journalism. Advertising and public relations majors may choose from five optional areas of emphasis: account services, creative/interactive, digital communication, public relations or sports communication. Broadcasting and journalism majors also may complete an emphasis in sports communication. Additionally, broadcasting majors select either a news track or a production track.

ADMISSION

College Admission

The entrance requirements for the College of Journalism and Mass Communications are the same as the admission requirements for the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

These include:

  • English (4 units)
  • Mathematics (4 units)
  • Social studies (3 units)
  • Natural sciences (3 units), and
  • Foreign language (2 units)

One unit equals one year of high school credit. Students with one deficiency, two deficiencies but not in the same category, or two deficiencies in foreign language who receive a Deferred Admission or Admission by Review, may be considered for admission to the college. Students who are admitted through the Admission by Review process with core course deficiencies will have certain conditions attached to their enrollment at UNL. These conditions are explained under Admission to the University, Removal of Deficiencies. High school deficiencies must be removed during the first 30 credit hours of enrollment at UNL (60 hours for foreign language) or the first calendar year, whichever takes longer.

Admission Deficiencies/Removal of Deficiencies

You must remove entrance deficiencies in geometry and foreign language before you can graduate from the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Removing Foreign Language Deficiencies

A student will need to complete the second semester of the first-year language sequence to clear the deficiency and the second semester of the second-year language sequence to complete the college graduation requirement in language.

Removing Geometry Deficiency

A deficiency of one year of geometry can be removed by taking two high school geometry courses by Independent Study or by completing a geometry course from an accredited community college or a four-year institution. Neither of these options will count for college credit.

Admission GPA

Any student transferring into the college must have at least a 2.0 GPA. A student with 12 or more hours of college credit must have at least a 2.0 GPA to be admitted or readmitted to the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Readmission

A student who left the University not in good standing (below a 2.0 grade point average) may be readmitted in the Explore Center. Such a student would be eligible to reenter the College of Journalism and Mass Communications upon attaining a 2.0 cumulative GPA. This student would follow the bulletin in effect at the time of the transfer from the Explore Center to the college.

Other Admission Requirements

Students from other Colleges

College of Journalism and Mass Communications courses will be restricted to College of Journalism and Mass Communications majors except where stipulated differently. Students from colleges and departments with a written agreement with the College of Journalism and Mass Communications will be exempt from this policy. Permission may be granted by an associate dean of the College of Journalism and Mass Communications in special circumstances following the directives provided by the faculty in these matters.

ESL Students

Applicants who speak English as a second language must present a TOEFL score of 70 or higher, which includes a subscore of at least 20 on the writing test. Additionally, broadcasting majors must present a score of at least 45 on the Test of Spoken English.

ADVISING

Academic Advising

Upon enrollment in the college, each student is assigned a professional academic advisor. As part of the JOMC 100 (1 hour), First-Year Experience course, a student will work with his or her advisor to begin developing a four-year plan. The student is expected to consult with the advisor each semester before registering for the next semester’s courses.

Although advisors seek to assist students in the selection of courses leading toward graduation, the final decision regarding which courses are taken is ultimately the student’s. Therefore, students are responsible for identifying and enrolling in those courses that will lead to completion of all published degree requirements in a timely manner.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS & POLICIES

Course Exclusions & Restrictions

Course Exclusions

Courses from the following areas will not count toward the bachelor of journalism degree.

  • athletic coaching (ATHC)
  • athletic training (ATHT)
  • vocational agricultural leadership and education (ALEC) courses, except ACE certified courses and approved ALEC minor courses
  • vocational and adult education courses, business education courses student assistantships, teaching assistantships, proctoring, or grading internships of a journalistic nature taken through any university unit or department outside the College of Journalism and Mass Communications
  • any independent study course, clinical course, experiential course or practicum outside the College of Journalism and Mass Communications undertaken without the prior written approval of the student’s advisor
  • driver training education
  • industrial arts (including courses concerned primarily with manual skills, tools, machines, or industrial processes and design)
  • orientation courses, such as UNL’s ASCI 107, BIOC 101, BIOS 150, BIOS 160, EDPS 150, FDST 107, NRES 101, NUTR 150, PSYC 100, PSYC 150, TEAC 210, VBMS 101
  • math courses below 100 and MATH 100A
  • courses on word processing or data entry
  • BSAD 150

Course Restrictions

Credit toward the degree may be earned in only one course, including honors sections, from each group of courses listed below:

ACCT 200 or either ACCT 201 or ACCT 202

BIOS 312 or AGRO 360

BIOS 313 or BIOS 314

BLAW 300 or either BLAW 371 or BLAW 372

CHEM 105, CHEM 109, CHEM 111, CHEM 113, CHEM 195

CHEM 116 or CHEM 221

CHEM 251 and more than 1 cr of CHEM 263

CHEM 471 or CHEM 481

CSCE 252D or CSCE 155N

CSCE 252D or ELEC 121

CSCE 340 or CSCE 480

ECON 200 or either ECON 211 or ECON 212

ECON 210, or ECON 211 and ECON 212

ECON 215, CRIM 300, EDPS 459 or STAT 218

FINA 300 or FINA 361

FREN 201 and FREN 202, or FREN 210

GEOL 100 or GEOL 101 or GEOL 101H

GEOL 103 or GEOL 105

GERM 201 and GERM 202, or GERM 210

LATN 102 or LATN 201

MATH 101 and/or MATH 102 or MATH 103

MATH 104 or MATH 106

MATH 200 or MATH 300

MATH 201 or MATH 301

MATH 440 or MECH 480

MNGT 300 or MNGT 320

MRKT 300 or MRKT 341

PHYS 141 or PHYS 151

PHYS 151 or MSYM 109

SOCI 205 or CRIM 251

SOCI 311 or CRIM 337

SOCI 474 or CRIM 413

SPAN 201 and SPAN 202, or SPAN 210

STAT 218 or CRIM 300 or ECON 215 or EDPS 459 or SOCI 206

Credit Rules

Credit by Examination

Through study or experience that parallels a University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Journalism and Mass Communications course, a regularly enrolled university student may feel prepared to pass an examination on the course content for course credit. To apply for credit, a student should:

1. Pick up a credit-by-examination form at the Information Window, Office of the University Registrar, 107 Canfield Administration Building;

2. Secure the approval signature of the dean of the college;

3. Have the Office of the University Registrar verify that he or she is currently enrolled;

4. Secure the Bursar’s Receipt for Payment of the examination fee; and

5. Present the completed form to the instructor designated by the dean’s office.

The instructor will then give the examination and report the results to the Office of the University Registrar through the dean of the college. A student is not permitted to receive credit by examination in a course that is a prerequisite for one in which he or she already has received credit.

The College of Journalism and Mass Communications also gives credit for the subject and general examinations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) administered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Inquire in 107 Canfield Administration Building for the current policy regarding CLEP examinations.

Grade Appeals

The following is a synopsis of the College of Journalism and Mass Communications grade appeals policy. The policy is designed to provide students with protection through orderly procedures against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation. A student with a concern about a grade should take the following steps:

1. Talk with the instructor involved. Many problems are resolved at this level.

2. Complete a grade appeals form (available from your advisor) and speak with an associate dean in 147 Andersen Hall.

3. If you still have concerns following these steps, ask the associate dean to take the matter to the college's executive committee, which will make a final decision.

Student Recognition

Honors and Awards

Outstanding students are honored each spring during an honors convocation. The college recognizes students whose cumulative grade point averages place them in the top 10 percent of their respective classes, students who hold scholarships and students who have earned special awards.

In addition, the college distributes a semester dean’s list. To be included on the semester dean’s list, a student must have earned at least a 3.7 semester GPA on 12 or more graded hours.

Kappa Tau Alpha. The Will Owen Jones Chapter of Kappa Tau Alpha, the national journalism honorary, recognizes outstanding undergraduate and graduate students. Membership is limited to those in the top 10 percent of the junior and senior classes in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications who have completed the junior-level professional courses. Each year the society honors a student achieving the highest four-year grade point average in the college and presents an award to the professional Distinguished Journalist of the Year.

Alpha Delta Sigma. As the only national honorary society for advertising students, ADS recognizes outstanding academic achievement. Since ADS was initiated in 1976, students nominated by their faculty advisors have been elected by division leaders into this exclusive scholastic group. An ADS chapter was founded at UNL in 1993. To be eligible for nomination, students must be enrolled in the local American Advertising Federation chapter (Ad Club).

Alpha Epsilon Rho. Alpha Epsilon Rho recognizes superior scholarship in the field of broadcasting. The University of Nebraska chapter was chartered in 1946. Membership is by invitation upon completion of 9 hours in broadcasting with a cumulative grade of 3.25 in broadcasting and 3.0 cumulative or above. For more information, contact the college office in 147 Andersen Hall.

Degrees With Distinction

In recognition of academic excellence, the college recommends the bachelors degree with distinction, with high distinction and with highest distinction. To be recommended, candidates must fulfill the specific criteria as described below, in addition to meeting all the general criteria and procedures applicable to all distinction classifications. The honors thesis or creative project and results of the examination over the thesis in each instance must be acceptable to the advisory committee.

Highest Distinction. Candidates for the bachelors degree may be recommended for degrees with highest distinction on the basis of the following criteria: scholastic standing within the top 5 percent of the graduating class of the college in the preceding 12-month period and the advisory committee’s recommendation based upon a thesis or comparable creative effort and an oral examination over that thesis or creative effort.

High Distinction. Candidates for the bachelors degree may be recommended for degrees with high distinction by fulfilling one of two sets of criteria: 1) by achieving scholastic standing within the top 5 percent of the graduating class of the college in the preceding 12-month period; or 2) by achieving scholastic standing within the top 10 percent of the graduating class of the college in the preceding 12-month period and by recommendation of the advisory committee based on a thesis or comparable creative effort and an oral examination over that thesis or creative effort.

Distinction. Candidates for the bachelors degree may be recommended for degrees with distinction by achieving one of two sets of criteria: 1) by achieving scholastic standing within the top 10 percent of the graduating class of the college in the preceding 12-month period; or 2) by achieving scholastic standing within the top 15 percent of the graduating class (never below a 3.7 GPA) of the college for the preceding 12-month period and by recommendation of the college’s advisory committee based upon a thesis or comparable creative effort and an oral examination over that thesis or creative effort.

The following criteria apply to all categories: Ordinarily, only students who have taken their last 48 hours of course work in residence will be considered for degrees with distinction. In considering individual cases, the advisory committee will review both grades and the program of courses. Students who choose one of the thesis options described above should make arrangements before their senior year by consulting with their academic advisors. Even if they're not Honors Program students, these students must register for ADPR 499H, BRDC 499H or JOUR 499H for one hour of credit in the semester they plan to complete the thesis proposal and register for an additional two hours of credit in the semester they plan to complete the thesis. Normally, the thesis must be completed ten weeks before the end of the fall or spring terms to meet the deadlines of Graduation Services. At least two members of the student’s honors thesis committee must make a recommendation to the advisory committee on the thesis work.

During the semester before the student intends to graduate, she or he should visit the dean’s office in Andersen Hall to obtain the schedule of deadline dates for submission of reports of examining committees. The forms for making the reports are also available in the dean’s office.

Scholarships

Each year the college awards more than 100 scholarships, which include both freshmen and upperclassmen awards.

College scholarship information is available on the college's website. Current students' applications must be completed in MyRED by February 1. Awards are made in April and May. Entering freshmen must apply as part of the unversity's undergraduate application process.

Senior Degree Audit

Students should review a current degree audit through MyRED with their advisor the semester before they plan to graduate to identify any unfulfilled requirements in the student’s academic program. Students cannot graduate until their degree audit is complete and approved by Graduation Services. The degree audit is updated nightly.

Application for Degree

Graduation Requirements

Students are expected to develop a clear understanding of degree requirements and to plan their course of study with a college advisor. Students requiring clarification of outstanding degree requirements should visit with a college advisor promptly.

Students should access their Degree Audit via MyRED at least once each term to review degree requirements and progress toward graduation. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure their Degree Audit is accurate.

Students who believe their Degree Audit has errors or omissions should visit with a college advisor promptly. It is important that students resolve these matters as soon as possible to avoid a delay in graduation.

Each student with MyRED access must submit an online Application for Graduation via MyRED for each degree to be received by the deadline posted in the academic calendar.

Students submitting an electronic Application for Graduation via MyRED will be billed a $25.00 per degree fee on their student account. Failure to submit a timely Application for Graduation may preclude the awarding of a degree in the intended term.

The student's Application for Graduation and required $25.00 fee are good only for the term marked on the application. Neither the application nor the fee are transferrable to another term. If a student submits an Application for Graduation and pays the $25.00 fee for a specified term but does not complete the degree requirements in that term, the student will need to reapply to graduate in a future term and incur another $25.00 fee.

Commencement ceremony information will be communicated to all degree applicants approximately one month before graduation. Each student who has applied for graduation must submit an online Commencement Attendance Form via MyRED, which will be available when the information is distributed.

Only those students who have applied for graduation, had the application accepted, and fulfilled all degree requirements as of the last day of the academic term may participate in the commencement ceremony for that term. Ceremony participation is allowed only in the term during which the student has properly applied for graduation and fulfilled degree requirements.

Student Standing/Classification

Sophomore Standing. For admission to sophomore standing a student must have completed a minimum of 27 semester hours of credit and attained a total grade point average of at least C.

Junior Standing. A student has junior standing after meeting the requirements for sophomore standing and completing 53 semester hours of credit.

Senior Standing. A student has senior standing after meeting the requirements for junior standing and completing 89 semester hours of credit.

Waivers/Substitutions

Waiver

The college will allow no waivers for graduation requirements. If students think they have met the intent of a particular requirement in some other fashion, they may submit a substitution request form.

Substitution

The form requires students to justify the request and secure recommendations from an academic advisor. Students must submit completed requests to an academic advisor. Decisions to grant or deny requests will be made by their academic advisor on non-major issues and by the appropriate associate dean on issues regarding the major. Appeals will go to the college’s executive committee.

Students must remember that it is their responsibility to know and follow the graduation requirements of the college. A substitution request should come only after all other avenues of advising and course work have been exhausted.

A substitution shall be defined as:

1. The replacement of a required course by a course of very similar content.

2. Credit by examination when offered.

3. The replacement of a required course with significant professional experience. This will be allowed only in rare instances. The experience will substitute only for course content, not for credit hours. Additional credit hours may be needed to maintain minimum credit hour requirements for graduation.

ACE REQUIREMENTS

All students must fulfill the Achievement-Centered Education (ACE) requirements. Information about the ACE program may be viewed at http://ace.unl.edu.

BULLETIN TO USE

Students who left the university in good standing may be readmitted to the College of Journalism and Mass Communications and they may choose the bulletin under which they wish to graduate according to the following guidelines:

1. Students must fulfill the requirements stated in the Undergraduate Bulletin for the year they enter the College of Journalism and Mass Communications or in any subsequent bulletin published while they are enrolled in the college.

2. A student must meet the requirements from one bulletin only rather than choosing a portion from one bulletin and the remainder from another.

3. No returning student may use a bulletin that is 10 years old or older. In addition, any student seeking graduation credit for a College of Journalism and Mass Communications course taken more than 10 years prior to graduation must demonstrate mastery of the material currently included in that course at the proficiency level satisfactory to the relevant associate dean and one or more faculty members qualified to teach the course in question. Students unable to demonstrate satisfactory mastery of the course material will be required to repeat the original course or a corresponding contemporary course designated by the college’s advisory committee, if the original course is no longer offered.

COLLEGE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

College General Education Requirements

To graduate with a bachelor of journalism degree, students must complete requirements from the following areas:

  • the University ACE requirements
  • the requirements for a major offered by the college
  • the non-major requirements that are specific to the college

College Non-Major Requirements

The college non-major requirements (NMR) are designed to further the purposes of liberal education by encouraging study in several different areas. Courses satisfying these requirements may impart specialized knowledge or broadly connect the subject matter to other areas of knowledge.

Group 1

The college requires a second set of ACE 1-9 courses beyond the ACE courses required by UNL, which must include a lab related to an ACE 4 course. This set of courses is identified as Group 1.

Group 2

Candidates for the bachelor of journalism degree must abide by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication accrediting guidelines, which require 72 semester hours be completed outside the college in subjects approved by UNL as liberal education/liberal arts courses and traditional liberal arts and sciences courses. All ACE courses from outside the College of Journalism and Mass Communications, and all traditional liberal arts courses (departments identified in the degree audit) will apply to Group 2, along with non-vocational ALEC courses, College of Business Administration courses and College of Fine and Performing Arts courses and any from NUTR, HRTM, and TMFD, unless specifically excluded. These 72 hours of liberal education/liberal arts courses are identified as Group 2.

Students graduating with 120 hours can take a maximum of 48 hours in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications. Students may take additional hours in the college, but those hours will be in addition to the 120 hours required to graduate.

Group 3—Specializations: 36 hours

CoJMC majors must complete the 36-hour requirement for specializations (areas of focus) outside the College of Journalism and Mass Communications. This requirement can be accomplished by completing a series of concentrations (12-hour minimum) and/or minors specified by a department or an inter-disciplinary program (Plan A or Plan B). For any outside concentration, at least half of the hours in the concentration must be at the 200-level or above. For example, students could declare:

  • Three concentrations or minors of 12 hours each from different subject areas outside the college
  • Two concentrations or minors of 18 hours each from different subject areas outside the college
  • Two concentrations or minors of 24 hours and 12 hours each from different subject areas outside the college
  • One concentration of 36 hours from one subject area outside the college

If students take an 18-hour minor and a 15-hour minor, they may complete one more 3-hour course in either area to satisfy the 36-hour requirement.

Courses may count simultaneously toward two minors or concentrations only after 36 hours have been completed.

In no case will CoJMC courses count toward a concentration or a minor. Only grades of C or better will count toward concentrations, minors or second majors.

Students who complete an inter-college major in the College of Arts & Sciences of 24-35 hours will complete the specializations requirement by taking the balance of the 36 hours from the major department or by taking a separate 12-hour concentration. Students completing an arts and sciences major will additionally need to complete the arts and sciences distribution requirements.

Students who complete a dual matriculation are exempt from the specialization requirement.

Group 4—Languages—Classical and Modern: 0-6 or 10 hours

A student who has completed the fourth-year level of one foreign language in high school is exempt from the languages requirement. All foreign language courses as well as American Sign Language courses will count also in Group 2. Language courses at the 100 level or those numbered 201, 202 or 210 do not apply to Group 3 concentrations. Language course numbered 203, 204, or 300 and higher will apply to Group 3 concentrations.

Options for completion of language requirement:

1. Regular four-semester sequence: 101, 102, 201, and 202 (5, 5, 3, 3 hours for a total of 16)

2. Three-semester sequence: 101, 102, and 210 (5, 5, 6 hours for a total of 16)

3. Students who have completed at least two years of one foreign language in high school may satisfy the college’s foreign language requirement by completing 101 and 102 in a different foreign language.

4. Students who have not taken four years of the same foreign language in high school but who complete the Modern Language Placement Exam and are placed into 203 (or higher) of that language, are exempt from the foreign language requirement without credit toward the degree.

Students who have taken three years or fewer of a foreign language in high school should contact the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures for recommended placement.

A student who achieves a specified scaled score in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject exam in French, German and Spanish, Levels 1 and 2, may be exempted from the language requirement and may also receive credit for the fourth semester course in the language. Students who want to exercise this option must receive permission from an associate dean of the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

A student who has demonstrated acceptable proficiency in a language other than English is exempt from the foreign language requirement without credit toward the degree (for example, international students who completed high school outside the United States). The student's academic advisor will determine whether a placement exam administered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures is necessary.

Group 5

At least 30 of the 120 semester hours of credit must be in courses numbered above 299.

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit is required for graduation from the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

The college will accept no more than 15 semester hours of grades less than a C from any program outside the University of Nebraska system. No grades less than a C will count toward a major, a minor, or concentration.

Pass/No Pass Limits

The college will accept up to 24 hours of Pass/No Pass courses toward a bachelor of journalism degree, subject to the following limits:

All courses in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications must be taken for grade only, unless otherwise specified. This applies to both majors and non-majors.

The Pass/No Pass (P/N) option is designed to be used by students seeking to expand their intellectual horizons by taking courses in areas where they may have minimum preparation without adversely affecting a student’s grade point average.

1. Neither a P (pass) nor an N (no pass) contributes to a student’s GPA.

2. P (pass) is interpreted to mean a grade of C or better. A student who earns a C- or lower will receive a grade of N.

3. P/N is not available to students on academic probation unless the course is offered only that way.

4. The 24-hour college limit does not include courses offered on a Pass/No Pass only basis or AP credit. This limit does apply to transfer courses from UNO, UNK, UNMC, and other institutions.

5. P/N hours can count toward fulfillment of group requirements, including concentrations, up to the 24-credit hour maximum.

6. Students may change from graded to P/N only until half way through the course. Additionally, after the half-way date, a student registered for P/N cannot change to graded unless the P/N registration is in conflict with a professor, department, college, or university policy governing P/N. Changing from graded to P/N or from P/N to graded can be completed on MyRED or by filing a drop/add form with the Office of the University Registrar, 107 Canfield Administration Building, and needs no instructor’s approval.

Residency

Students must complete at least 30 of the 120 total hours for their degree at UNL. Students must complete at least half of their major course work including 6 hours above 299 in their major, and 15 of the 30 hours required above 299 in residence. Students transferring hours into the advertising and public relations, broadcasting, or journalism majors must meet additional requirements, which are described under Transfer Credit Rules. To encourage participation in international study, the college accepts all prior-approved education abroad credits as hours in residence.

Transfer Credit Rules

The goal of the following policy is to ensure that students from other campuses meet the same standards required of students who take all their courses at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

The college will accept up to 6 hours in journalism and mass communications courses taken at institutions that do not have an accredited journalism and mass communications program. Students must take the remainder of the required hours in their ADPR, BRDC, JOMC or JOUR courses on campus at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. In advertising and public relations, these courses must include one 300- or 400-level ADPR course and ADPR 429, ADPR 439 or ADPR 489; and in broadcasting, BRDC 370 and BRDC 472 or BRDC 360 and BRDC 462. In journalism, the courses must include JOUR 302 and either JOUR 450, JOUR 446 or JOUR 497. Students from ACEJMC-accredited programs may request equivalency reviews of the required courses at those schools. Degree candidates must accumulate 72 credit hours of non-journalism and mass communications classes. These are to be selected from ACE courses outside of journalism and mass communications courses or courses in disciplines listed as Liberal Education/Liberal Arts, which includes non-vocational ALEC courses, College of Business Administration courses and College of Fine and Performing Arts courses.

Credit for courses taken at foreign universities and colleges will be transferred only after evaluation by the appropriate associate dean. This evaluation may include examination of the student over subject matter studied at the foreign institution.

DEGREES & MAJORS

Bachelor of Journalism Degree Requirements

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit is required for graduation from the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

A maximum of 12 hours of military science (MLSC), naval science (NAVS), and aerospace studies (AERO) may be counted toward the degree.

A maximum of 4 hours of practice courses in varsity sports and recreational activity courses (ATHP, COMB, FITN, INDV, ODED and RACS) or Basic Military Science, which is credit for active military duty, not ROTC course work.

Majors

The major is 40 hours in advertising and public relations, broadcasting and, journalism.

Students must choose at least one of three undergraduate majors—advertising and public relations, broadcasting, or journalism. Each of these majors requires professional courses for students. Additionally, all students must take the following core courses: JOMC 100, JOMC 101, JOMC 130, JOMC 131, JOMC 132, JOMC 133, JOMC 134, JOMC 486, and JOMC 487. See the major page for specifics about these courses.

Students may complete two majors in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications by completing all requirements for each major. However, the second major in the college will not take the place of a concentration outside the college, shown in Group 3.

Intercollege Studies

A student in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications pursuing a bachelor of journalism degree may also complete a second major in the College of Arts and Sciences as part of a four-year program. In addition to ACE and College of Journalism and Mass Communications requirements, students will be expected to meet all College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements and major requirements. Because students choosing this option will not be earning a degree from Arts and Sciences, they will not be eligible for Arts and Sciences-based scholarships and aid, but they will be eligible for consideration for Phi Beta Kappa.

A student who prefers to receive a second degree would file for dual matriculation. Such a student would complete an additional 30 hours as part of earning the second degree.

JGEN courses, which are open to students from any college, do not count in any College of Journalism and Mass Communications major, but can count toward ACE requirements. Non-College of Journalism and Mass Communications students must have permission to enroll in any ADPR, BRDC, or JOUR courses. Permission generally is reserved for students whose colleges have agreements with the College of Journalism and Mass Communications.

MINORS & AREAS OF SPECIALIZATIONS OFFERED

The college offers a 12-hour emphasis in sports communication for CoJMC students enrolled in any of the college's three majors. All students take JOMC 150, Introduction to Sports Communication, and at least 3 other credit hours from Section A. The remaining 6 hours may be taken from Section A or Section B.

Section A
  • ADPR 464 Sports Media Relations & Promotions (3 hr)
  • BRDC 375 Sports Broadcasting (3 hr)
  • JOUR 326 Sports Reporting (3 hr)
  • ADPR, BRDC, or JOUR internship in sports
Section B
  • ADPR 151 Introduction to Advertising & Public Relations (3 hr)
  • ADPR 207 Communicating to Public Audiences (ALEC 207) (3 hr)
  • ADPR 283 Strategy Development for Advertising & Public Relations (3 hr)
  • ADPR 450 Public Relations Theory & Strategy (3 hr)
  • ADPR 451 Public Relations Techniques (3 hr)
  • JOUR 201 Editing I (3 hr)
  • JOUR 202 Reporting I (3 hr)

The 12 hours for the emphasis may not include any course already required for the major. Students must meet the prerequisites for the classes or be admitted with special permission from the instructor.

GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION

Graduate Courses

Seniors in the University who have obtained in advance the approval of the dean for Graduate Studies may receive up to 12 credit hours for graduate courses taken in addition to the courses necessary to complete their undergraduate work, provided that such credits are earned within the calendar year prior to receipt of the baccalaureate. For procedures, inquire at the Office of Graduate Studies.

Course work taken prior to receipt of the baccalaureate may not be accepted for transfer to other institutions as graduate work.

The Graduate Program

A graduate program, leading to the master of arts degree, was established in 1975. It is designed to prepare the student to translate more effectively to mass audiences the complexities of a rapidly changing society. The program offers three graduate specializations:

  • Media Studies
  • Integrated Media Communications
  • Professional Journalism

Students entering the program must have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in an accredited program in journalism and mass communications or extensive professional experience. Persons seeking more information about graduate study in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications should consult the graduate bulletin or call or write the Gilbert M. and Martha H. Hitchcock Center for Graduate Study and Professional Journalism, 127 Andersen Hall, 402-472-3042, or visit the college’s website.

Hitchcock Center for Graduate Study and Professional Journalism Development

The Hitchcock Center, with a $250,000 endowment from the Gilbert M. and Martha H. Hitchcock Foundation, helps finance the graduate program in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications and further develops the skills of Nebraska’s professional journalists. It accomplishes the latter goal by giving direct support to the state’s professional journalists through research projects and statewide workshops aimed at improving skills in newswriting, broadcasting and advertising and public relations. The center also funds a $5,000 graduate fellowship. Gilbert M. Hitchcock was a United States senator from Nebraska and founder of the Omaha World-Herald.